suitor


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suit·or

(so͞o′tər)
n.
1. One who courts another.
2. A person who makes a petition or request.
3. Law A person who sues in court; a plaintiff; a petitioner.
4. A person or entity trying to acquire a controlling interest in a company, as by purchasing sufficient shares of its stock.

[Middle English, plaintiff, from Anglo-Norman, from Latin secūtor, follower, from secūtus, past participle of sequī, to follow; see sekw-1 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

suitor

(ˈsuːtə; ˈsjuːt-)
n
1. a man who courts a woman; wooer
2. (Law) law a person who brings a suit in a court of law; plaintiff
3. rare a person who makes a request or appeal for anything
[C13: from Anglo-Norman suter, from Latin secūtor follower, from sequī to follow]

suit•or

(ˈsu tər)

n.
1. a man who courts or woos a woman.
2. Law. a petitioner or plaintiff.
3. a person who sues or petitions for anything.
4. an individual or company that seeks to buy another company.
[1250–1300; Middle English s(e)utor, suitour < Anglo-French < Latin secūtor <sequi to follow]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.suitor - a man who courts a womansuitor - a man who courts a woman; "a suer for the hand of the princess"
adorer, admirer - someone who admires a young woman; "she had many admirers"
prince charming - a suitor who fulfills the dreams of his beloved

suitor

noun
1. (Old-fashioned) admirer, young man, beau, follower (obsolete), swain (archaic), wooer My mother had a suitor who adored her.
2. bidder, customer, candidate, applicant The company was making little progress in trying to find a suitor.

suitor

noun
1. A man who courts a woman:
2. One that asks a higher authority for something, as a favor or redress:
3. One who humbly entreats:
Translations
مُتَقَدِّم بِطَلَب الزَّواج
ctitel
frier
kérõ
biîill
âşıkbir kıza talip olan erkek

suitor

[ˈsuːtəʳ] N
1. (= lover) → pretendiente m
2. (Jur) → demandante mf

suitor

[ˈsuːtər] nsoupirant m, prétendant m

suitor

n
(old, of woman) → Freier m (old), → Verehrer m
(Jur) → Kläger(in) m(f)
(Econ) → Übernahmeinteressent m

suitor

[ˈsuːtəʳ] ncorteggiatore m, spasimante m

suit

(suːt) noun
1. a set of clothes usually all of the same cloth etc, made to be worn together, eg a jacket, trousers (and waistcoat) for a man, or a jacket and skirt or trousers for a woman.
2. a piece of clothing for a particular purpose. a bathing-suit / diving-suit.
3. a case in a law court. He won/lost his suit.
4. an old word for a formal request, eg a proposal of marriage to a lady.
5. one of the four sets of playing-cards – spades, hearts, diamonds, clubs.
verb
1. to satisfy the needs of, or be convenient for. The arrangements did not suit us; The climate suits me very well.
2. (of clothes, styles, fashions etc) to be right or appropriate for. Long hair suits her; That dress doen't suit her.
3. to adjust or make appropriate or suitable. He suited his speech to his audience.
ˈsuited adjective
(negative unsuited) fitted, or appropriate (to or for). I don't think he's suited to/for this work.
ˈsuitor noun
an old word for a man who tries to gain the love of a woman.
ˈsuitcase noun
a case with flat sides for clothes etc, used by a person when travelling. He hastily packed his (clothes in his) suitcase.
follow suit
to do just as someone else has done. He went to bed and I followed suit.
suit down to the ground
(of eg an arrangement, fashion etc) to suit (a person) completely. The dress suits her down to the ground.
suit oneself
to do what one wants to do.
References in classic literature ?
Iniquum petas ut aequum feras is a good rule, where a man hath strength of favor: but otherwise, a man were better rise in his suit; for he, that would have ventured at first to have lost the suitor, will not in the conclusion lose both the suitor, and his own former favor.
When old Mr Fox was dead, the wolf came as a suitor, and knocked at the door, and the cat who was servant to Mrs Fox, opened it for him.
When it became known that the old fox was dead, suitors presented themselves.
This is the Court of Chancery, which has its decaying houses and its blighted lands in every shire, which has its worn-out lunatic in every madhouse and its dead in every churchyard, which has its ruined suitor with his slipshod heels and threadbare dress borrowing and begging through the round of every man's acquaintance, which gives to monied might the means abundantly of wearying out the right, which so exhausts finances, patience, courage, hope, so overthrows the brain and breaks the heart, that there is not an honourable man among its practitioners who would not give--who does not often give--the warning, "Suffer any wrong that can be done you rather than come here
A few lawyers' clerks and others who know this suitor by sight linger on the chance of his furnishing some fun and enlivening the dismal weather a little.
When a suitor presents himself and asks for the lady's hand in marriage, he is shown three caskets, one of gold, one of silver, and one of lead.
The suitor repairs not to the bower of his mistress, but to her father's lodge, and throws down a present at his feet.
THE GODS IN COUNCIL--MIVERVA'S VISIT TO ITHACA--THE CHALLENGE FROM TELEMACHUS TO THE SUITORS.
At length, tempest- tost, he himself arrives; he makes certain persons acquainted with him; he attacks the suitors with his own hand, and is himself preserved while he destroys them.
But the "Odyssey" itself left much untold: what, for example, happened in Ithaca after the slaying of the suitors, and what was the ultimate fate of Odysseus?
Here came the suitors numbered according to their arrival, and they were ranged in rows, six in each row, and they were so tightly packed that they could not move their arms.
The death of her father and mother and the rich acres of land that had come down to her had set a train of suitors on her heels.