sulfur


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sul·fur

also sul·phur  (sŭl′fər)
n.
1. Symbol S A pale yellow nonmetallic element occurring widely in nature in several free, allotropic and crystal forms and combined in numerous sulfates and sulfides. It is used in black gunpowder, rubber vulcanization, the manufacture of insecticides and pharmaceuticals, and in the preparation of sulfur compounds such as hydrogen sulfide and sulfuric acid. Atomic number 16; atomic weight 32.066; melting point 115.21°C; boiling point 444.61°C; specific gravity at 20°C (rhombic) 2.07, (monoclinic) 2.00; valence 2, 4, 6. See Periodic Table.
2. Any of various butterflies of the subfamily Coliadinae of the family Pieridae, having yellow or orange wings often marked with black.
tr.v. sul·fured, sul·fur·ing, sul·furs also sul·phured or sul·phur·ing or sul·phurs
To treat with sulfur or a compound of sulfur.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman sulfre, from Latin sulfur.]

sulfur

(ˈsʌlfə)
n
(Elements & Compounds) the US preferred spelling of sulphur

sul•fur

(ˈsʌl fər)

n.
1. Also, esp. Brit., sulphur. a nonmetallic element, ordinarily a flammable yellow solid, of widespread occurrence in combined form, as in sulfide and sulfate compounds and cellular protein: used esp. in making gunpowder and matches, in medicine, and in vulcanizing rubber.Symbol: S; at. wt.: 32.064; at. no.: 16; sp. gr.: 2.07 at 20° C.
[1300–50; Middle English < Latin sulp(h)ur, sulfur brimstone, sulfur]

sul·fur

also sul·phur (sŭl′fər)
Symbol S A pale-yellow, brittle nonmetallic element that occurs widely in nature, especially in volcanic deposits, many common minerals, natural gas, and petroleum. It is used to make gunpowder and fertilizer, to vulcanize rubber, and to produce sulfuric acid. Atomic number 16. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sulfur - an abundant tasteless odorless multivalent nonmetallic elementsulfur - an abundant tasteless odorless multivalent nonmetallic element; best known in yellow crystals; occurs in many sulphide and sulphate minerals and even in native form (especially in volcanic regions)
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
brimstone, native sulfur, native sulphur - an old name for sulfur
sulfide, sulphide - a compound of sulphur and some other element that is more electropositive
oil of vitriol, sulfuric acid, sulphuric acid, vitriol - (H2SO4) a highly corrosive acid made from sulfur dioxide; widely used in the chemical industry
Verb1.sulfur - treat with sulphur in order to preserve; "These dried fruits are sulphured"
process, treat - subject to a process or treatment, with the aim of readying for some purpose, improving, or remedying a condition; "process cheese"; "process hair"; "treat the water so it can be drunk"; "treat the lawn with chemicals" ; "treat an oil spill"
Translations
síra
svovl
SchwefelSulfur
sulfuro
väävel
rikki
sumpor
kén
belerangsulfur
brennisteinn
sulfursulpur
siera
sulf
síra
žveplo
svavel
lưu

sul·fur

n. azufre, sulfuro.
References in classic literature ?
Gunpowder was not invented by any one; it was the lineal successor of the Greek fire, which, like itself, was composed of sulfur and saltpeter.
Plants overcome the sulfur deficiency later in the season when soil mineralization rates increase and a larger root explore a greater volume of soil.
In agricultural systems, sulfur is purposely applied as a fungicide, pH regulator and vital plant nutrient.
The trick was to find a chemical middleman that binds to the sulfur and keeps it from dissolving, Nazar said.
Natural gas and petrochemicals contain varying amounts of sulfur compounds, which can be corrosive to equipment and inhibit or destroy catalysts used in gas processing.
Elemental sulfur has been a problem for natural gas transmission systems ever since natural gas transmission systems have been around.
This will allow researchers to analyze if the sulfur was able to permeate into the canola plant.
Detailed is an analysis of how the concentration of sulfur and manganese in gray iron at solidification relates to gray iron microstructure and mechanical properties.
Electric utilities produce about two -thirds of all the sulfur dioxide emitted each year in the United States.
Sulfur is important as a soil amendment chemical to generate and maintain a favored low pH for the acid-loving tea bush.
Qatar Petroleum's plans to develop Qatar's North Field natural gas resources is expected to make that country one of the world's largest sulfur producer s by the end of the decade and probably the largest single producer in the Middle East, according to industry analysts.
Under the EPA's Tier 2 standards for passenger vehicles and light-duty trucks, refineries' and importers' sulfur levels must be capped at 300 ppm beginning in 2004 and each annual corporate average must not exceed 120 ppm.

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