sumach


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sumac
smooth sumac
Rhus glabra

su·mac

also su·mach  (so͞o′măk, sho͞o′-)
n.
1. Any of various shrubs or small trees of the genera Rhus and Toxicodendron, having compound leaves, clusters of small greenish flowers, and usually red, hairy fruit. Species in the genus Toxicodendron, such as poison sumac, have toxic sap.
2. A tart, dark reddish-brown powder made from the ground dried fruits of a Eurasian sumac (Rhus coriaria), used as a seasoning in Middle Eastern cuisine.

[Middle English, preparation made from sumac, from Old French (possibly via Medieval Latin sumach), from Arabic summāq, sumac tree, from Aramaic, dark red, from səmaq, to be red; see smq in Semitic roots.]

sumach

(ˈsuːmæk; ˈʃuː-) or

sumac

n
1. (Plants) any temperate or subtropical shrub or small tree of the anacardiaceous genus Rhus, having compound leaves, clusters of green flowers, and red hairy fruits. See also poison sumach
2. (Dyeing) a preparation of powdered leaves of certain species of Rhus, esp R. coriaria, used in dyeing and tanning
3. (Tanning) a preparation of powdered leaves of certain species of Rhus, esp R. coriaria, used in dyeing and tanning
4. (Forestry) the wood of any of these plants
[C14: via Old French from Arabic summāq]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sumach - a shrub or tree of the genus Rhus (usually limited to the non-poisonous members of the genus)sumach - a shrub or tree of the genus Rhus (usually limited to the non-poisonous members of the genus)
genus Rhus, Rhus - deciduous or evergreen shrubs and shrubby trees of temperate and subtropical North America, South Africa, eastern Asia and northeastern Australia; usually limited to nonpoisonous sumacs (see genus Toxicodendron)
sumac - wood of a sumac
fragrant sumac, lemon sumac, Rhus aromatica - sweet-scented sumac of eastern America having ternate leaves and yellowish-green flowers in spikes resembling catkins followed by red hairy fruits
Rhus glabra, scarlet sumac, smooth sumac, vinegar tree - common nonpoisonous shrub of eastern North America with waxy compound leaves and green paniculate flowers followed by red berries
black sumac, dwarf sumac, mountain sumac, Rhus copallina, shining sumac - common nonpoisonous shrub of eastern North America with compound leaves and green paniculate flowers followed by red berries
Rhus ovata, sugar sumac, sugar-bush - evergreen shrub of southeastern United States with spikes of reddish yellow flowers and glandular hairy fruits
Rhus typhina, staghorn sumac, velvet sumac, vinegar tree, Virginian sumac - deciduous shrubby tree or eastern North America with compound leaves that turn brilliant red in fall and dense panicles of greenish yellow flowers followed by crimson acidic berries
Rhus trilobata, skunkbush, squawbush, squaw-bush - deciduous shrub of California with unpleasantly scented usually trifoliate leaves and edible fruit
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
References in classic literature ?
They plunged into the narrow path between the tall sumach bushes, and were at once hidden in the gloom.
Now he turned in his tracks, between the walls of sumach bushes -- turned himself as carefully as if he were a ship -- and then stepped quickly but cautiously along.
Three minutes later the old man and his sons, well armed, were up the hill, and just entering the sumach path on tiptoe, their weapons in their hands.
A deep and careless incision had been made into each tree, near its root, into which little spouts, formed of the I bark of the alder, or of the sumach, were fastened; and a trough, roughly dug out of the linden, or basswood, was I lying at the root of each tree, to catch the sap that flowed from this extremely wasteful and inartificial arrangement.
I dug my cellar in the side of a hill sloping to the south, where a woodchuck had formerly dug his burrow, down through sumach and blackberry roots, and the lowest stain of vegetation, six feet square by seven deep, to a fine sand where potatoes would not freeze in any winter.
Their book, Turbo Chicks: Talking Young Feminisms, challenged the image of young women as apathetic, apolitical dupes of an anti-feminist backlash when it was published by Sumach Press in 2001.
The stag's horn sumach, or Rhus typhina, can also be relied on for autumn impact when its lance-shaped green leaves turn shades of orange, red, yellow and purple.
Traditionally, "Chelow" is served with a dollop of butter, and a generous dusting of sumac (dried, crushed berries of sumach tree with a sour, lemony flavor).
Writing in The American Botanist in 1909, Frank Dobbin recalled, "Our grandmothers too had a use for the sumach.
SUMACH THE Stag's Horn Sumach, or Rhus typhina, is one of the best shrubs for autumn impact.