sun


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sun

 (sŭn)
n.
1. often Sun The star around which Earth and other planets orbit. It provides heat and light to Earth. It has a mean distance from Earth of about 150 million kilometers (93 million miles), a diameter of approximately 1,391,000 kilometers (864,000 miles), and a mass about 333,000 times that of Earth.
2. A star that is the center of a planetary system.
3. The radiant energy, especially heat and visible light, emitted by the sun; sunshine.
4. A sunlike object, representation, or design.
v. sunned, sun·ning, suns
v.tr.
To expose to the sun's rays, as for warming, drying, or tanning.
v.intr.
To expose oneself or itself to the sun.
Idioms:
in the sun
In the public eye.
under the sun
On the earth; in the world.

[Middle English, from Old English sunne; see sāwel- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

sun

(sʌn)
n
1. (Astronomy) the star at the centre of our solar system. It is a gaseous body having a highly compressed core, in which energy is generated by thermonuclear reactions (at about 15 million kelvins), surrounded by less dense radiative and convective zones serving to transport the energy to the surface (the photosphere). The atmospheric layers (the chromosphere and corona) are normally invisible except during a total eclipse. Mass and diameter: 333 000 and 109 times that of earth respectively; mean distance from earth: 149.6 million km (1 astronomical unit).
2. (Astronomy) any star around which a planetary system revolves
3. (Physical Geography) the sun as it appears at a particular time or place: the winter sun.
4. (General Physics) the radiant energy, esp heat and light, received from the sun; sunshine
5. a person or thing considered as a source of radiant warmth, glory, etc
6. (Heraldry) a pictorial representation of the sun, often depicted with a human face
7. (Poetry) poetic a year or a day
8. (Poetry) poetic a climate
9. archaic sunrise or sunset (esp in the phrase from sun to sun)
10. (Pathology) catch the sun to become slightly sunburnt
11. place in the sun a prominent or favourable position
12. (Nautical Terms) shoot the sun take the sun nautical to measure the altitude of the sun in order to determine latitude
13. (Pathology) touch of the sun slight sunstroke
14. under the sun beneath the sun on earth; at all: nobody under the sun eats more than you do.
vb, suns, sunning or sunned
15. (Physiology) to expose (oneself) to the sunshine
16. (Physiology) (tr) to expose to the sunshine in order to warm, tan, etc
[Old English sunne; related to Old High German sunna, Old Frisian senne, Gothic sunno]
ˈsunˌlike adj

sun

(sʌn)

n., v. sunned, sun•ning. n.
1. (often cap.) the star that is the central body of the solar system, around which the planets revolve and from which they receive light and heat: its mean distance from the earth is about 93 million miles (150 million km), its diameter about 864,000 miles (1.4 million km), and its mass about 330,000 times that of the earth.
2. this star with reference to its position in the sky, the temperature it produces, the time when it is seen, etc.
3. the heat and light from the sun; sunshine: to be exposed to the sun.
4. a self-luminous heavenly body; star.
5. a figure or representation of the sun, as a heraldic bearing surrounded with rays and marked with human facial features.
6. something likened to the sun in brightness, splendor, etc.
7. sunrise or sunset: to travel from sun to sun.
8. Archaic.
a. a day.
b. a year.
v.t.
9. to expose to the sun's rays.
10. to warm, dry, etc., in the sunshine.
v.i.
11. to expose oneself or be exposed to the rays of the sun.
Idioms:
under the sun, on earth; anywhere.
[before 900; Middle English sun, sonne, Old English sunne, c. Old Frisian sunne, Old Saxon, Old High German, Old Norse sunna, Gothic sunno; akin to Old Norse sōl, Gothic sauil, Latin sōl, Greek hḗlios]

Sun.

Sunday.
click for a larger image
sun
cutaway diagram of the sun

sun

(sŭn)
1. Often Sun The star that is orbited by all of the planets and other bodies of our solar system and that supplies the heat and light that sustain life on Earth. It has a diameter of about 864,000 miles (1,390,000 kilometers), an average distance from Earth of about 93 million miles (150 million kilometers), and a mass about 330,000 times that of Earth. See Table at solar system. See Note at dwarf star.
2. A star that is the center of a system of planets.

Sun


Archaic. a description of the surface markings on a planet or the spots on the sun.
the observation of the corona of the sun by use of a telescope modifled to simulate an eclipse. — coronagraphic, adj.
an instrument used in astronomy to show the apparent movement of the sun.
1. the measurement of the duration and intensity of sunlight.
2. the system or process of signaling by reflecting the sun’s rays in a mirror.
3. an early photographic process involving coated metal plates exposed to sunlight. — heliographer, n. — heliographic, heliographical, adj.
the worship of the sun. — heliolator, n.
Archaic. the science of the sun. — heliologist, n.
an abnormal love of the sun.
1. an abnormal fear of sunlight.
2. an avoidance of sunlight.
the study of motions of the solar surf ace.
a method of treating illness by exposure to the rays of the sun.
an instrument for measuring the intensity of the sun’s radiation. — pyrheliometric, adj.
an instrument for measuring the intensity of radiant energy, composed of vanes which rotate at speeds proportionate to the intensity of the energy source. — radiometric, adj.
the measurement of radiant energy by means of a radiometer. — radiometric, adj.
the transformation of radiant energy into sound.
1. sunstroke.
2. Obsolete, a sun bath or exposure to the sun for curative purposes.
1. the explanation of myths by reference to the sun or the personifi-cation of the sun, as the hero as sunfigure.
2. an overreliance on this method of interpretation. — solarist, n.
a room designed and situated so as to receive the maximum amount of sunlight.

Sun

 

See Also: MOON, SKY, SUNSET

  1. The afternoon sunlight was like gold embroidery on the grass —Paul Horgan
  2. Autumn sunlight poured out over the rock [of Quebec] like a heavy southern wine —Willa Cather
  3. Bars of sunlight crossed the backyard like the bars of a bright strange cell —Carson McCullers
  4. Bits of sunlight bright as butterflies —Eudora Welty
  5. The citronade of the pale morning sun shimmered like a multitude of violins —Angela Carter
  6. The daylight-saving sunshine lay like custard on the oaks and mistletoe —Wallace Stegner
  7. The fast-setting sun lighted the tops of the trees like flames of candles —Z. Vance Wilson
  8. The heat from the scorching [California] sun hit them like a knock-out punch —Jilly Cooper
  9. The high sun fell like balm on her body —Mary Hedin
  10. The huge sun light flamed like a monstrous dahlia with petals of yellow fire —Oscar Wilde
  11. It [sunlight] licks thick as a tongue at my skin —Sharon Sheehe Stark
  12. The last of the sun [at dusk] like a great splash of blood on the sky —George Garrett
  13. The muffled sunlight gleamed like gold tissue through grey gauze —Edith Wharton
  14. The new morning sun shone like a pink rose in the heavens —Kenneth Koch
  15. A pale sun appeared over the clouds like an invalid sitting up in bed —John Mortimer
  16. A red sun as flat and still against the sky as moonlight on pond water —Charles Johnson
  17. The red sun was pasted on the sky like a wafer —Anon
  18. The rising sun is like a ball of blood —Robert W. Service
  19. A scarlet sun, round and brilliant as a blooded egg yolk —Cynthia Ozick
  20. A sharp-as-needle sun sat high over Virginia … like a heathen god, sure of itself —Thomas Keneally
  21. The sinking sun hung like a red balloon over the Hudson River—Belva Plain
  22. The strong sun (of late April) pours down as though a gigantic golden basin full of light and wind were being emptied on us —Erich Maria Remarque
  23. The sun advanced on the city and lit the topmost spines of the hill, painting the olive drab slopes in crazy new colors, like the drawing of a spangled veil —William Brammer
  24. Sun … as light and dry as old sherry —Raymond Chandler

    See Also: DRYNESS, LIGHTNESS

  25. The sun, as red as a furnace on the edge of the horizon —Émile Zola
  26. The sun blazed like a flaming bronze mirror —Bernard Malamud
  27. The sun breaks [over the land] like a cracked egg —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  28. The sun breaks through the cloud like revelation —Delmore Schwartz
  29. The sun burned feebly through the mist like a circle cut from Christmas paper —MacDonald Harris
  30. The sun dazzled off the asphalt in fragments like breaking glass —George Garrett
  31. The sun drew strength from them like a giant sponge —Caryl Phillips
  32. The sun … drops on our heads like a stone —Marge Piercy
  33. The sun, dull, like the face of an old man —Maxim Gorky

    See Also: DULLNESS

  34. The sun fades like the spreading of a peacock’s tail —John Ashbery
  35. The sun fell thick as a blanket —Lee Smith
  36. The sun flared in the sky, fat and red as a tangerine —T. Coraghessan Boyle

    A variation by Marge Piercy: “The sun hangs like a tangerine.”

  37. The sun flashed like a torrent of warm white wine —Du Bose Heyward
  38. The sun floats up above the horizon, like a shimmering white blimp —Margaret Atwood
  39. The sun hangs overhead like a lantern —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  40. The sun hits him like a slap in the face —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  41. The sun … shone like a polished brass knob —Helen Hudson
  42. The sun hung in the cloudless sky like an unblinking yellow eye —Harvey Swados
  43. (It was a misty autumn morning,) the sun just struggling through like a great chrysanthemum —Pamela Hansford Johnson
  44. The sun lay like a friendly arm across her shoulder —Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
  45. The sun … lay on the horizon like a dissolving orange suffused with blood —John Hawkes
  46. The sunlight dripped over the house like golden paint over an art jar —F. Scott Fitzgerald
  47. Sunlight dropped into it (the dark foliage) like a drizzle of gold —Isak Dinesen
  48. Sunlight fell like a shower of gold through the leaves of the chestnut trees —Silvia Tennenbaum
  49. The sunlight hit her like a boxing glove —Jilly Cooper
  50. The sunlight … plunged like tiny knives into my already bleary eyes —James Crumley
  51. Sunlight splashed through the trees, the beams hazy like shafts of light filtered through stained glass —Robert J. Serling
  52. Sunlight that was like a bright driving summer rain —Paule Marshall
  53. Sun (is sitting atop the trees) like a big round cheddar —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  54. The sun looks, through the mist, like a plum on the tree of heaven, or a bruise on the slope of your belly —William H. Gass
  55. The sun lulled in the sky like a mule —Larry McMurtry
  56. The sun overhead beat the surface of the pool like a drum —James B. Hall
  57. The sun peeping above the trees, looked like a giant golf ball —P. G. Wodehouse

    Wodehouse was known for his golf stories so this is a particularly apt comparison for him.

    See Also: GOLF

  58. The sun … poised like a ball of fire on the very edge of the mountains —Henry Van Dyke
  59. The sun popped over the edge of the prairie like a broad smiling face —Willa Cather
  60. The sun poured down like fire —Isaac Bashevis Singer
  61. Sun … reflected back to me like a shiny bedspread whose design is hundreds of wind-driven roller coasters —Richard Brautigan
  62. The sun rested like a warm palm on the back of her neck —Francis King
  63. The sun rolled over the horizon like the red rim of a wagon wheel —Rita Mae Brown
  64. The sun … rose swiftly and flashed like a torch with dazzling rays —Felix Salten
  65. The sunshine burned the pasture like fire —Rudyard Kipling
  66. The sunshine [of January day] cut like icicles —Edith Wharton
  67. The sunshine made spots before your eyes … as though a thousand weddings were to be held that day —Boris Pasternak
  68. Sunshine spread like butter over the fields —Lael Tucker Wertenbaker
  69. Sunshine that stretched like cloth of gold all up and down Fifth Avenue —Helen Hudson
  70. The sun shone as if there were no death —Saul Bellow
  71. The sun shone like a million dollars —Larry McMurtry
  72. The sun shone like Mr. Happy Face himself —Tom Robbins
  73. The sun shone with such violence that in an illumination like a long-prolonged glare of lightning the heavens looked black and white —Eudora Welty
  74. The sun shot upward and began to spin like a red cup on the point of a spear —Isaac Babel
  75. Sun sizzling like a skillet in the sky —Helen Hudson
  76. Sun slanting like a blade —Bin Ramke
  77. The sun’s rays like sheaves of wheat are gold and dry —Dame Edith Sitwell
  78. The sun stood still like a great shining altar —Hans Christian Andersen
  79. The sun swerves silently like a cyclist round the bend —Herbert Read
  80. The sun throbbed like a fever —William Plomer
  81. Sun … huge as a mountain of diamonds —Dame Edith Sitwell
  82. The sun up in the towering sky turns like a spinning ball —Edwin Muir
  83. The sun was high enough to sit on the roofs of buildings like a great open fire warming everything —Mark Helprin
  84. The sun was like a burning-glass —William Plomer

    This comparison from a poem entitled In the Snake Park refers to a lens used to focus the sun’s rays to start a fire.

  85. The sun was like a good cup of tea, strong and hot —Mike Fredman
  86. The sun was like a hot iron on their backs —Paul Horgan
  87. The sun was like a whip —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  88. The sun was pouring in like maple syrup into a green bowl —Carlos Baker
  89. The sun was shining like a congratulation —Margaret Millar
  90. The sun was streaking the sky with strips of red and white, like a slab of bacon —Jean Thompson
  91. [Sun] swung … like a faded shabby orange —Hugh Walpole
  92. (While they embraced,) the sun vanished as if it had been switched off —W. P. Kinsella
  93. The white sun twinking like the dawn under a speckled cloud —Percy Bysshe Shelley
  94. The yellow sun was ugly, like a raw egg on a plate —Elizabeth Bishop

sun


Past participle: sunned
Gerund: sunning

Imperative
sun
sun
Present
I sun
you sun
he/she/it suns
we sun
you sun
they sun
Preterite
I sunned
you sunned
he/she/it sunned
we sunned
you sunned
they sunned
Present Continuous
I am sunning
you are sunning
he/she/it is sunning
we are sunning
you are sunning
they are sunning
Present Perfect
I have sunned
you have sunned
he/she/it has sunned
we have sunned
you have sunned
they have sunned
Past Continuous
I was sunning
you were sunning
he/she/it was sunning
we were sunning
you were sunning
they were sunning
Past Perfect
I had sunned
you had sunned
he/she/it had sunned
we had sunned
you had sunned
they had sunned
Future
I will sun
you will sun
he/she/it will sun
we will sun
you will sun
they will sun
Future Perfect
I will have sunned
you will have sunned
he/she/it will have sunned
we will have sunned
you will have sunned
they will have sunned
Future Continuous
I will be sunning
you will be sunning
he/she/it will be sunning
we will be sunning
you will be sunning
they will be sunning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been sunning
you have been sunning
he/she/it has been sunning
we have been sunning
you have been sunning
they have been sunning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been sunning
you will have been sunning
he/she/it will have been sunning
we will have been sunning
you will have been sunning
they will have been sunning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been sunning
you had been sunning
he/she/it had been sunning
we had been sunning
you had been sunning
they had been sunning
Conditional
I would sun
you would sun
he/she/it would sun
we would sun
you would sun
they would sun
Past Conditional
I would have sunned
you would have sunned
he/she/it would have sunned
we would have sunned
you would have sunned
they would have sunned
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sun - the star that is the source of light and heat for the planets in the solar systemSun - the star that is the source of light and heat for the planets in the solar system; "the sun contains 99.85% of the mass in the solar system"; "the Earth revolves around the Sun"
chromosphere - a gaseous layer of the sun's atmosphere (extending from the photosphere to the corona) that is visible during a total eclipse of the sun
photosphere - the intensely luminous surface of a star (especially the sun)
solar system - the sun with the celestial bodies that revolve around it in its gravitational field
2.sun - the rays of the sunsun - the rays of the sun; "the shingles were weathered by the sun and wind"
light, visible light, visible radiation - (physics) electromagnetic radiation that can produce a visual sensation; "the light was filtered through a soft glass window"
sunburst - a sudden emergence of the sun from behind clouds
sunbeam, sunray - a ray of sunlight
3.sun - a person considered as a source of warmth or energy or glory etc
important person, influential person, personage - a person whose actions and opinions strongly influence the course of events
4.sun - any star around which a planetary system revolves
star - (astronomy) a celestial body of hot gases that radiates energy derived from thermonuclear reactions in the interior
5.sun - first day of the weekSun - first day of the week; observed as a day of rest and worship by most Christians
day of rest, rest day - a day set aside for rest
weekend - a time period usually extending from Friday night through Sunday; more loosely defined as any period of successive days including one and only one Sunday
Verb1.sun - expose one's body to the sun
lie - be lying, be prostrate; be in a horizontal position; "The sick man lay in bed all day"; "the books are lying on the shelf"
2.sun - expose to the rays of the sun or affect by exposure to the sun; "insolated paper may turn yellow and crumble"; "These herbs suffer when sunned"
expose - expose or make accessible to some action or influence; "Expose your students to art"; "expose the blanket to sunshine"

sun

noun
1. Sol, Helios (Greek myth), Phoebus (Greek myth), daystar (poetic), eye of heaven, Phoebus Apollo (Greek myth) The sun was now high in the southern sky.
2. sunshine, sunlight, daylight, light, rays, warmth They were trying to soak up the sun.
sun yourself sunbathe, tan, bask She was last seen sunning herself in a riverside park.
Related words
adjective solar
like heliomania
Translations
شَمْسنور الشَّمْسيَتَشَمَّسأحد النُّجوم الثابِتَه
sol
slunceslunitslunit se
solsolskin
suno
päike
آفتابخورشید
Aurinkoauringonlaskuauringonnousuauringonpaisteauringonvalo
Sunce
napnapfény
sólsól, sólskinsóla sig
太陽
태양
sol
saulėsaulėgrąžasaulės laikrodissaulės smūgissaulės spindulys
Saulesaulesgaismasauļotiessildīties saulē
soare
slnko
sonce
solsolljussolnedgångsoluppgång
พระอาทิตย์
Mặt TrờiThái Dương

sun

[sʌn]
A. Nsol m
the sun is shiningbrilla el sol, hace sol
the sun is in my eyesme da el sol en los ojos
he rises with the sunse levanta con el sol
to catch the sun: you've caught the sunte ha cogido el sol
to be (out) in the sunestar al sol
under the sun they have everything under the sunno les falta de nada
they would do anything under the sun to stay in powerserían capaces de hacer cualquier cosa para seguir en el poder
he called me all the names under the sunme llamó de todo
there is nothing new under the sunno hay nada nuevo bajo el sol
B. VT to sun o.s.tomar el sol, asolearse (LAm), tomar sol (S. Cone)
C. CPD sun dress Nvestido m de playa
sun god Ndios m del sol, divinidad f solar
sun hat Npamela f, sombrero m de ala ancha
sun lamp Nlámpara f solar ultravioleta
sun lotion Nbronceador m
sun lounge Nsolana f
sun lounger Ntumbona f
sun parlour, sun parlor (US) Nsolana f
sun umbrella Nsombrilla f

sun

[ˈsʌn]
n
(= star) → soleil m
The sun came out briefly → Le soleil s'est montré brièvement.
everything under the sun → tout sur cette terre
(= sunshine) → soleil m
under a burning sun → sous un soleil brûlant
to sit in the sun → s'asseoir au soleil
to catch the sun → prendre des couleurs
modif [damage] → du soleil; [exposure] → au soleil; [protection] → solaire sun deck
vt
to sun o.s. → prendre le soleil

Sun

abbr of SundaySo.

sun

nSonne f; I’ve got the sun in my eyesdie Sonne scheint mir in die Augen, die Sonne blendet mich; he was up with the suner stand in aller Frühe auf; to have a touch of the suneinen Sonnenstich haben (also fig); you’ve caught the sundich hat die Sonne erwischt; he’s tried everything under the suner hat alles Menschenmögliche versucht; a place in the sun (fig)ein Platz an der Sonne; there’s nothing new under the sun (prov) → es ist alles schon einmal da gewesen (Prov)
vtder Sonne aussetzen
vrsich sonnen

sun

:
sunbaked
adjausgedörrt
sun bath
nSonnenbad nt
sunbather
nSonnenanbeter(in) m(f) (hum); all the suns in the parkall die Leute, die sich im Park sonnen or die im Park in der Sonne liegen
sunbathing
nSonnenbaden nt
sunbeam
nSonnenstrahl m
sun bed
nSonnenbank f

sun

:
sun blind
n (= awning)Markise f; (= venetian blind)Jalousie f
sun block
nSonnenschutzcreme f, → Sunblockcreme f
sun bonnet
nSonnenhut m
sunburn
nBräune f; (painful) → Sonnenbrand m
sunburnt
adjsonnengebräunt, sonnenverbrannt; (painfully) → von der Sonne verbrannt; to get sunbraun werden; (painfully) → (einen) Sonnenbrand bekommen
sunburst
n
(= pattern)Sonnenrad nt

sun

:
sundew
n (Bot) → Sonnentau m
sundial
nSonnenuhr f
sundown
n (Brit) → Sonnenuntergang m; at/before sunbei/vor Sonnenuntergang
sundowner
n
(Austral inf: = tramp) → Penner m (inf), → Vagabund m
(= drink)Abendtrunk m
sun-drenched
adj beachessonnenüberflutet, in Sonne getaucht
sundress
nleichtes Sonnenkleid
sun-dried
adj fruitan or in der Sonne getrocknet

sun

:
sunfast
adj (esp US) → lichtecht
sunflower
nSonnenblume f

sun

:
sunglasses
plSonnenbrille f
sun-god
nSonnengott m
sun-goddess
nSonnengöttin f
sunhat
nSonnenhut m
sun helmet
nTropenhelm m

sun

:
Sun King
nSonnenkönig m
sun-kissed
adj (liter)von der Sonne geküsst
sun lamp
nHöhensonne f
sunless
adj gardenohne Sonne; room alsodunkel; day alsotrübe
sunlight
nSonnenlicht nt; in the sunin der Sonne, im Sonnenlicht
sunlit
adj room, daysonnig; fields etc alsosonnenbeschienen
sun lounge
nWintergarten m, → Glasveranda f
sun lounger
nSonnenliege f

sun

:
sun parlor
n (US) → Wintergarten m, → Glasveranda f
sun porch
nVeranda f
sunray
nSonnenstrahl m
adj attr sun lampHöhensonne f; sun treatmentUltraviolettbehandlung f
sun-ripened
adj fruit, vegetablessonnengereift
sunrise
nSonnenaufgang m; at sunbei Sonnenaufgang
sunrise industry
nZukunftsindustrie f
sunroof
n (of car)Schiebedach nt; (of hotel etc)Sonnenterrasse f
sunscald
n (Bot) → Sonnen- or Rindenbrand m
sunscreen
sunseeker
nSonnenhungrige(r) mf
sunset
nSonnenuntergang m; at sunbei Sonnenuntergang
sunshade
n (lady’s, over table) → Sonnenschirm m; (= awning)Markise f, → Sonnenblende f
sunshine
n
Sonnenschein m; hours of sunSonnenstunden pl; a daily average of 5 hours’ sundurchschnittlich 5 Stunden Sonne täglich
(inf, = person) → mein Lieber, meine Liebe
sunshine roof
n (Brit) → Schiebedach nt
sunspot
n
(inf, for holiday) → Ferienparadies nt
sunstroke
nSonnenstich m; to get suneinen Sonnenstich bekommen
sunstruck
adj to be suneinen Sonnenstich haben
sunsuit
nSpiel- or Sonnenanzug m
suntan
nSonnenbräune f; to get a sunbraun werden; sun lotion/oilSonnenöl nt
suntanned
suntrap
sunup
n (US) → Sonnenaufgang m; at sunbei Sonnenaufgang
sun-worship
n (lit, fig)Sonnenanbetung f
sun-worshipper
n (lit, fig)Sonnenanbeter(in) m(f)

sun

[sʌn]
1. nsole m
to get up with the sun → alzarsi allo spuntar del sole
the sun is in my eyes → ho il sole negli occhi
in the sun → al sole
you've caught the sun! → come sei abbronzato!
a place in the sun (also) (fig) → un posto al sole
they have everything under the sun → hanno tutto ciò che possono desiderare
there's nothing new under the sun → non c'è niente di nuovo sotto il sole
2. vt to sun o.s.godersi il sole

sun

(san) noun
1. the round body in the sky that gives light and heat to the earth. The Sun is nearly 150 million kilometres away from the Earth.
2. any of the fixed stars. Do other suns have planets revolving round them?
3. light and heat from the sun; sunshine. We sat in the sun; In Britain they don't get enough sun; The sun has faded the curtains.
verbpast tense, past participle sunned
to expose (oneself) to the sun's rays. He's sunning himself in the garden.
ˈsunless adjective
without sun, or lacking sunlight. a sunless room.
ˈsunny adjective
1. filled with sunshine. sunny weather.
2. cheerful and happy. The child has a sunny nature.
ˈsunniness noun
ˈsunbathe verb
to lie or sit in the sun, especially wearing few clothes, in order to get a suntan.
ˈsunbeam noun
a ray of the sun.
ˈsunburn noun
the brown or red colour of the skin caused by exposure to the sun's rays.
ˈsunburned, ˈsunburnt adjective
sunburnt faces.
ˈsundial noun
a device, usually in a garden, for telling time from the shadow of a rod or plate on its surface cast by the sun.
ˈsundown noun
(especially American) sunset.
ˈsunflower noun
a type of large yellow flower with petals like rays of the sun, from whose seeds we get oil.
ˈsunglasses noun plural
glasses of dark-coloured glass or plastic to protect the eyes in bright sunlight.
ˈsunlight noun
the light of the sun. The cat was sitting in a patch of sunlight.
ˈsunlit adjective
lighted up by the sun. a sunlit room.
ˈsunrise noun
the rising of the sun in the morning, or the time of this.
ˈsunset noun
the setting of the sun, or the time of this. the red glow of the sunset.
ˈsunshade noun
a type of umbrella for sheltering a person from the sun; a parasol.
ˈsunshine noun
1. the light of the sun. The children were playing in the sunshine.
2. cheerfulness or happiness.
ˈsunstroke noun
a serious illness caused by being in very hot sunshine for too long.
ˈsuntan noun
a brown colour of the skin caused by exposure to the sun. I'm trying to get a suntan.
catch the sun
to become sunburnt.
under the sun
in the whole world. I'm sure that he must have visited every country under the sun.

sun

شَمْس slunce sol Sonne ήλιος sol aurinko soleil sunce sole 太陽 태양 zon sol słońce sol солнце sol พระอาทิตย์ güneş mặt trời 太阳

sun

n. sol;
___ -bathingbaño de ___;
___ -burnquemadura de ___, eritema solar;
___ -burntquemado-a, tostado-a por el sol;
___ exposureestar expuesto-a al ___;
vt.
to ___ -bathetomar el ___.

sun

n sol m; to get — tomar el sol, asolearse
References in classic literature ?
The snow was light, and with her broom she soon swept a path all round the garden, for Beth to walk in when the sun came out and the invalid dolls needed air.
The feet of the boy in the road kicked up a cloud of dust that floated across the face of the departing sun.
A canopy had been arranged over their boat to keep off the scorching rays of the sun.
While the train flashed through never-ending miles of ripe wheat, by country towns and bright-flowered pastures and oak groves wilting in the sun, we sat in the observation car, where the woodwork was hot to the touch and red dust lay deep over everything.
Why, it seems to me the sun is hot enough to have warmed the very depths of the ocean.
Now those noble golden coins of South America are as medals of the sun and tropic token-pieces.
Wherefore I diligently pretended, unto this and that and the other one, that your power against the sun could not reach its full until the morrow; and so if any would save the sun and the world, you must be slain to-day, while your enchantments are but in the weaving and lack potency.
As I fumbled around for the matches, knocking things down with my quaking hands, I wished the sun would rise in the middle of the day, when it was warm and bright and cheerful, and one wasn't sleepy.
There are days when every stream is Pactolus and every man is Croesus, and thanks to that first and greatest of all alchemists, the sun, the morning I write of was a morning when to breathe was gold and to see was silver.
He showed me also, in one of his books, the figures of the sun, moon, and stars, the zodiac, the tropics, and polar circles, together with the denominations of many plains and solids.
All the people in the land loved him dearly, and called him the Sun-Hero, for they did not think his like existed under the sun.
This dazzling carpet, really a reflector, repelled the rays of the sun with wonderful intensity, which accounted for the vibration which penetrated every atom of liquid.