sunstone

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sun·stone

 (sŭn′stōn′)

sunstone

(ˈsʌnˌstəʊn)
n
(Minerals) another name for aventurine2
[C17: so called because it contains red and gold flecks which reflect the light]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sunstone - a translucent quartz spangled with bits of mica or other minerals
quartz - a hard glossy mineral consisting of silicon dioxide in crystal form; present in most rocks (especially sandstone and granite); yellow sand is quartz with iron oxide impurities
goldstone - aventurine spangled densely with fine gold-colored particles
transparent gem - a gemstone having the property of transmitting light without serious diffusion
References in classic literature ?
He loved the red gold of the sunstone, and the moonstone's pearly whiteness, and the broken rainbow of the milky opal.
The judges also acknowledged Sunstones onsite walking trail, fitness room, employee health initiatives, and company-organized participation in local running and walking events.
For the fourth consecutive year, Sunstone Circuits has been named one of the Healthiest Employers of Oregon.
Even when the sun is hidden behind clouds or just below the horizon, it is possible to pinpoint its location by detecting the polarization of light Scientists have thought that Vikings' sunstones may have been made of a kind of calcite crystal called Iceland spar, which is "birefringent," meaning that it splits the light that enters it and produces a double image.
No intact sunstones have been found at known Viking sites, so it's still unclear if Icelandic spar really was the sunstone featured in their sagas.
The researchers also indicated that the failure so far to find intact sunstones in Viking burial sites might be due to the practice of cremating warriors, which would have caused the delicate crystals to shatter.
Scientists have been trying to find evidence of the so-called sunstone after it was described in one Icelandic saga as a magical gem which, when held up to sky, would reveal the position of the sun even before dawn or after sunset.
Viking stories mention that objects called sunstones were used in navigation, but archaeologists can only guess at what they were - or even if they existed at all.
Oregon Sunstones is what these sparklers of the purple sage country are commonly called now, and their glitter in hues of yellow, pink, red and (rarely) blue and green attracts people looking for a gem of an adventure - and maybe a chance to make a little money.
This term we have been making Aztec sunstones using clay; we painted them using vibrant colours and glazed them.
As the series begins, the sunstones seem to be running low on batteries - T.
To check whether sunstones would work better, in 2005 they measured the polarization pattern of the entire sky under a range of weather conditions during a crossing of the Arctic Ocean on the Swedish icebreaker Oden5, 6.