supercilious


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su·per·cil·i·ous

 (so͞o′pər-sĭl′ē-əs)
adj.
Feeling or showing haughty disdain. See Synonyms at arrogant.

[Latin superciliōsus, from supercilium, eyebrow, pride : super-, super- + cilium, lower eyelid; see kel- in Indo-European roots.]

su′per·cil′i·ous·ly adv.
su′per·cil′i·ous·ness n.
Word History: The English word supercilious ultimately derives from the Latin word supercilium, "eyebrow." Supercilium came to mean "the eyebrow as used in frowning and expressing sternness, gravity, or haughtiness." From there it developed the senses "stern looks, severity, haughty demeanor, pride." The derived Latin adjective superciliōsus meant "full of stern or disapproving looks, censorious, haughty, disdainful," as it has since it entered English as supercilious in the 1500s. The super- in the Latin word supercilium means "above," and cilium was the Latin word for "eyelid." In many of the Romance languages, this word developed into the word for "eyelash." This development is probably reflected in the scientific use in English of the word cilium, whose plural is cilia. Cilia are the minute hairlike appendages of cells or unicellular organisms that move in unison in order to bring about the movement of the cell or of the surrounding medium.

supercilious

(ˌsuːpəˈsɪlɪəs)
adj
displaying arrogant pride, scorn, or indifference
[C16: from Latin superciliōsus, from supercilium eyebrow; see superciliary]
ˌsuperˈciliously adv
ˌsuperˈciliousness n

su•per•cil•i•ous

(ˌsu pərˈsɪl i əs)

adj.
haughtily disdainful or contemptuous, as a person or a look.
[1520–30; < Latin superciliōsus. See superciliary, -ous]
su`per•cil′i•ous•ly, adv.
su`per•cil′i•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.supercilious - having or showing arrogant superiority to and disdain of those one views as unworthy; "some economists are disdainful of their colleagues in other social disciplines"; "haughty aristocrats"; "his lordly manners were offensive"; "walked with a prideful swagger"; "very sniffy about breaches of etiquette"; "his mother eyed my clothes with a supercilious air"; "a more swaggering mood than usual"- W.L.Shirer
proud - feeling self-respect or pleasure in something by which you measure your self-worth; or being a reason for pride; "proud parents"; "proud of his accomplishments"; "a proud moment"; "proud to serve his country"; "a proud name"; "proud princes"
2.supercilious - expressive of contempt; "curled his lip in a supercilious smile"; "spoke in a sneering jeering manner"; "makes many a sharp comparison but never a mean or snide one"
uncomplimentary - tending to (or intended to) detract or disparage

supercilious

adjective scornful, arrogant, contemptuous, disdainful, lordly, proud, lofty, stuck-up (informal), patronizing, condescending, imperious, overbearing, snooty (informal), haughty, high and mighty (informal), vainglorious, toffee-nosed (slang, chiefly Brit.), hoity-toity (informal), uppish (Brit. informal) His manner is supercilious and arrogant.
modest, humble, meek, unassuming, unpretentious, submissive, self-effacing, deferential, obsequious

supercilious

adjective
Overly convinced of one's own superiority and importance:
Translations
مُتَشامِخ، مُحْتَقِر
pohrdavý
overlegen
òóttafullur, hrokafullur
augstprātīgsnicīgs

supercilious

[ˌsuːpəˈsɪlɪəs] ADJdesdeñoso, altanero

supercilious

[ˌsuːpərˈsɪliəs] adjhautain(e), dédaigneux/euse

supercilious

adj, superciliously
advhochnäsig

supercilious

[ˌsuːpəˈsɪlɪəs] adj (frm) → altezzoso/a, sprezzante

supercilious

(suːpəˈsiliəs) adjective
contemptuous or disdainful. a supercilious look.
ˌsuperˈciliously adverb
ˌsuperˈciliousness noun
References in classic literature ?
Her face beamed with satisfaction when the guest eyed the appointments with a supercilious glance.
While they talked of him he stood a little apart from the others, watching the noisy party with a good-humoured but faintly supercilious expression.
She liked me better from that time on, and she never took a supercilious air with me again.
He has been seated on a throne surrounded with minions and mistresses, giving audience to the envoys of foreign potentates, in all the supercilious pomp of majesty.
He smiled in a supercilious manner and said I had better do as I was asked.
I suppose they are reserving me for some grand occasion," said the Rocket; "no doubt that is what it means," and he looked more supercilious than ever.
She was not a supercilious or an over-dainty woman.
He seldom deigned to notice me; and, when he did, it was with a certain supercilious insolence of tone and manner that convinced me he was no gentleman: though it was intended to have a contrary effect.
He was heard in a loud, supercilious tone answering some state- ment ventured by the Chief Steward.
There were the junior clerks of flash houses - young gentlemen with tight coats, bright boots, well-oiled hair, and supercilious lips.
Like a dado round the room was the jutting line of splendid heavy game-heads, the best of their sort from every quarter of the world, with the rare white rhinoceros of the Lado Enclave drooping its supercilious lip above them all.
There was no concealing the fact, Cecil had meant to be supercilious, and he had succeeded.