supercilious


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su·per·cil·i·ous

 (so͞o′pər-sĭl′ē-əs)
adj.
Feeling or showing haughty disdain. See Synonyms at arrogant.

[Latin superciliōsus, from supercilium, eyebrow, pride : super-, super- + cilium, lower eyelid; see kel- in Indo-European roots.]

su′per·cil′i·ous·ly adv.
su′per·cil′i·ous·ness n.
Word History: The English word supercilious ultimately derives from the Latin word supercilium, "eyebrow." Supercilium came to mean "the eyebrow as used in frowning and expressing sternness, gravity, or haughtiness." From there it developed the senses "stern looks, severity, haughty demeanor, pride." The derived Latin adjective superciliōsus meant "full of stern or disapproving looks, censorious, haughty, disdainful," as it has since it entered English as supercilious in the 1500s. The super- in the Latin word supercilium means "above," and cilium was the Latin word for "eyelid." In many of the Romance languages, this word developed into the word for "eyelash." This development is probably reflected in the scientific use in English of the word cilium, whose plural is cilia. Cilia are the minute hairlike appendages of cells or unicellular organisms that move in unison in order to bring about the movement of the cell or of the surrounding medium.

supercilious

(ˌsuːpəˈsɪlɪəs)
adj
displaying arrogant pride, scorn, or indifference
[C16: from Latin superciliōsus, from supercilium eyebrow; see superciliary]
ˌsuperˈciliously adv
ˌsuperˈciliousness n

su•per•cil•i•ous

(ˌsu pərˈsɪl i əs)

adj.
haughtily disdainful or contemptuous, as a person or a look.
[1520–30; < Latin superciliōsus. See superciliary, -ous]
su`per•cil′i•ous•ly, adv.
su`per•cil′i•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.supercilious - having or showing arrogant superiority to and disdain of those one views as unworthy; "some economists are disdainful of their colleagues in other social disciplines"; "haughty aristocrats"; "his lordly manners were offensive"; "walked with a prideful swagger"; "very sniffy about breaches of etiquette"; "his mother eyed my clothes with a supercilious air"; "a more swaggering mood than usual"- W.L.Shirer
proud - feeling self-respect or pleasure in something by which you measure your self-worth; or being a reason for pride; "proud parents"; "proud of his accomplishments"; "a proud moment"; "proud to serve his country"; "a proud name"; "proud princes"
2.supercilious - expressive of contempt; "curled his lip in a supercilious smile"; "spoke in a sneering jeering manner"; "makes many a sharp comparison but never a mean or snide one"
uncomplimentary - tending to (or intended to) detract or disparage

supercilious

adjective scornful, arrogant, contemptuous, disdainful, lordly, proud, lofty, stuck-up (informal), patronizing, condescending, imperious, overbearing, snooty (informal), haughty, high and mighty (informal), vainglorious, toffee-nosed (slang, chiefly Brit.), hoity-toity (informal), uppish (Brit. informal) His manner is supercilious and arrogant.
modest, humble, meek, unassuming, unpretentious, submissive, self-effacing, deferential, obsequious

supercilious

adjective
Overly convinced of one's own superiority and importance:
Translations
مُتَشامِخ، مُحْتَقِر
pohrdavý
overlegen
òóttafullur, hrokafullur
augstprātīgsnicīgs

supercilious

[ˌsuːpəˈsɪlɪəs] ADJdesdeñoso, altanero

supercilious

[ˌsuːpərˈsɪliəs] adjhautain(e), dédaigneux/euse

supercilious

adj, superciliously
advhochnäsig

supercilious

[ˌsuːpəˈsɪlɪəs] adj (frm) → altezzoso/a, sprezzante

supercilious

(suːpəˈsiliəs) adjective
contemptuous or disdainful. a supercilious look.
ˌsuperˈciliously adverb
ˌsuperˈciliousness noun
References in classic literature ?
She liked me better from that time on, and she never took a supercilious air with me again.
She was not a supercilious or an over-dainty woman.
Blanche Ingram, after having repelled, by supercilious taciturnity, some efforts of Mrs.
These reflections had tamed and brought down to a pitch of sounder judgment a temper, which, under other circumstances, might have waxed haughty, supercilious, and obstinate.
I am told, on excellent authority, that her father keeps an American dry-goods store," said Sir Thomas Burdon, looking supercilious.
The central box contained the lean but pompous Sheriff, his bejeweled wife, and their daughter, a supercilious young woman enough, who, it was openly hinted, was hoping to receive the golden arrow from the victor and thus be crowned queen of the day.
He has been seated on a throne surrounded with minions and mistresses, giving audience to the envoys of foreign potentates, in all the supercilious pomp of majesty.
Had the belle of the season, in the pride of her beauty and power, been cut in a place of public resort by some supercilious exquisite, she could not have felt greater indignation than I did at this unexpected slight.
But the attorney saw that the impression was in favor of his client, and waving his hand with a supercilious manner, as if unwilling to insult the understanding of the jury with any further defence, he replied:
There were the junior clerks of flash houses - young gentlemen with tight coats, bright boots, well-oiled hair, and supercilious lips.
Her face beamed with satisfaction when the guest eyed the appointments with a supercilious glance.
He had swung round his revolving chair so as to face me, and he sat all puffed out like an enormous bull-frog, his head laid back and his eyes half-covered by supercilious lids.