superdense

su·per·dense

 (so͞o′pər-dĕns′)
adj.
1. Of or relating to an extreme condition in which matter is forced into nonclassical states, as when gravity in a collapsing star crushes electrons and protons together to form neutrons.
2. Of or relating to a quantum computer-coding technique in which two qubits of information are transmitted using one qubit by means of quantum entanglement.

superdense

(ˌsuːpəˈdɛns)
adj
(Astronomy) astronomy of or relating to an extreme condition in which matter is forced into nonclassical states, as when electrons are forced into protons, leaving only neutrons: superdense matter.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wei's role in the research was to analyze the theoretical performance of the superdense teleportation, and to show that the kind of quantum states--the donut states--teleported can encode high density of information.
Pulsars are rapidly spinning neutron stars, the superdense remains of massive stars that have exploded as supernovas.
Depending of the size of the original star, these events result in the creation of either a superdense object called a neutron star, or an even more exotic creature known as a black hole.
His topics are basic ideas of classical and quantum computational models and complexity classes, mathematical tools and simple quantum mechanics required for quantum computing, quantum gates and quantum circuits, quantum algorithms, quantum error correction, quantum teleportation and superdense coding, and quantum cryptography.
Neutron stars are the superdense remains of massive stars that have exploded as supernovas.
With heavy outer feathers and superdense layers of down, their legendary toughness made them perfect for our goal of field testing Federal's Black Cloud loads and Franchi's lovely new lightweight Affinity auto-loader series.
For, at the micro level, there is the dance between the proton and electron, the positive and the negative forces, between matter and energy; and, at the macro level, the relationship between the Big Bang (before which the whole cosmos was concentrated in a superdense ball of matter no larger than a human fist) and the seemingly endless Universe expanding at the rate of 186,000 miles/second for over 13,000,000,000 years, forming billions of galaxies, each containing billions of stars.
A swirling chaos of superdense matter with temperatures exceeding 18 billion degrees Fahrenheit surrounded the newborn black hole.
Neutron stars are the superdense "corpses" of massive stars that have exploded as supernovae.
They give you a really close look at objects that radiate them," objects like waltzing pairs of superdense stars and merging black holes.
Theory suggests that large stars with seven to 10 times the mass of the Sun end their lives either as white dwarfs, or by exploding and collapsing into superdense neutron stars.