superficiality


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Related to superficiality: expedite

su·per·fi·cial

 (so͞o′pər-fĭsh′əl)
adj.
1. Of, affecting, or being on or near the surface: a superficial wound.
2. Concerned with or comprehending only what is apparent or obvious; shallow: wrote him off as superficial.
3. Apparent rather than actual or substantial: a superficial resemblance between the two films.
4. Not extensive or important; minor or insignificant: made only a few superficial changes in the manuscript.

[Middle English, from Old French superficiel, from Latin superficiālis, from superficiēs, surface; see superficies.]

su′per·fi′ci·al′i·ty (-fĭsh′ē-ăl′ĭ-tē), su′per·fi′cial·ness (-fĭsh′əl-nĭs) n.
su′per·fi′cial·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.superficiality - lack of depth of knowledge or thought or feeling
depth - degree of psychological or intellectual profundity
glibness, slickness - a kind of fluent easy superficiality; "the glibness of a high-pressure salesman"
sciolism - pretentious superficiality of knowledge
profundity, profoundness - intellectual depth; penetrating knowledge; keen insight; etc; "the depth of my feeling"; "the profoundness of the silence"
2.superficiality - shallowness in terms of affecting only surface layers of something; "he ignored the wound because of its superficiality"
shallowness - the quality of lacking physical depth; "take into account the shallowness at that end of the pool before you dive"

superficiality

noun shallowness, lack of depth, lack of substance, emptiness, triviality the superficiality of the judgements we make when we first meet people
Translations
سَطْحِيَّه
povrchnost
overfladiskhed
felszínesség
yfirborîsháttur
yüzeysellik

superficiality

[ˌsuːpəˌfɪʃɪˈælɪtɪ] Nsuperficialidad f

superficiality

[ˌsuːpərfɪʃiˈæləti] n
(= shallowness) [person, place] → superficialité f
(= lack of depth) [analysis, judgement, book] → superficialité f

superficiality

n (of person, behaviour, injury, treatment, knowledge)Oberflächlichkeit f; (of characteristics, resemblance)Äußerlichkeit f

superficiality

[ˌsuːpəfɪʃɪˈælɪtɪ] nsuperficialità

superficial

(suːpəˈfiʃəl) adjective
1. on, or affecting, the surface only. The wound is only superficial.
2. not thorough. He has only a superficial knowledge of the subject.
ˈsuperˌficiˈality (-ʃiˈӕ-) noun
ˌsuperˈficially adverb
References in classic literature ?
When we went in, and I had removed her bonnet and coat, I took her on my knee; kept her there an hour, allowing her to prattle as she liked: not rebuking even some little freedoms and trivialities into which she was apt to stray when much noticed, and which betrayed in her a superficiality of character, inherited probably from her mother, hardly congenial to an English mind.
The narrowness and superficiality of the Anglo-Saxon tourist is nothing less than a menace.
With smiling ease, apologetically, Weeks tore to pieces all that Hayward had said; with elaborate civility he displayed the superficiality of his attainments.
I found that while among them there was a large element of substantial, worthy citizens, there was also a superficiality about the life of a large class that greatly alarmed me.
Footnote: Macaulay's well-known essay on Bacon is marred by Macaulay's besetting faults of superficiality and dogmatism and is best left unread.
I was surprised, considering the fierce struggle in the forecastle, at the superficiality of his hurts, and I pride myself that I dressed them dexterously.
The inevitable superficiality of the rabble is contrasted with the peaceful and profound depths of the anchorite.
Vronsky had several times already, though not so resolutely as now, tried to bring her to consider their position, and every time he had been confronted by the same superficiality and triviality with which she met his appeal now.
Being too positive in the workplace, rather than resulting in greater well-being and greater productivity, can lead to complacency and superficiality, the findings of one study showed.
After all this, the superficiality of politicians is demonstrated, whose only concern are their positions, even if this entails completely impoverished and neglected citizens, Popovska concludes.
Moreover, human behavior expert, Patrick Wanis, told the publication that we are often drawn to people who have an ego and confidence that is derived from their talent, but an empty ego, based on a fake self-inflated image and concept, creates an over powering sense of desperation and superficiality.
SUPERFICIALITY often marks policy declarations by our politicians and government officials.