superfluidity


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su·per·flu·id

 (so͞o′pər-flo͞o′ĭd)
n.
A fluid, such as liquid helium, that flows with little or no friction at temperatures close to absolute zero.

su′per·flu·id′i·ty (-flo͞o-ĭd′ĭ-tē) n.

superfluidity

(ˌsuːpəfluːˈɪdɪtɪ)
n
(General Physics) physics the state of being or property of becoming a superfluid
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References in periodicals archive ?
Lately, scientists studying Fermi gases have made tests of superfluidity a major thrust of their experiments.
1) Complete control and real time monitoring of molecular rotation inside liquid helium droplets, exploring superfluidity of the droplets, the possible formation of quantum vortices, and rotational dephasing due to interaction of the dissolved molecules with the He solvent.
For instance, there's superconductivity, in which coordinated pairs of electrons flow resistance free through a solid, and there's superfluidity, in which atoms or molecules flow without friction.
The obvious advantage of superfluidity is of course that it remains frictionless and invisible; these are main features required for true ether medium--i.
Frictionless flow, also known as superfluidity, has previously been observed only in liquids and gases (SN: 10/25/03, p.
Superfluidity in the Solar interior: implications for Solar eruptions and climate.
Scientists probing the origins of superfluidity, or frictionfree flow, found that an accumulation of just seven atoms of liquid helium appears sufficient to trigger that exotic state (164: 262).
2] Furthermore, it is known that superfluidity phenomena can also be observed in Fermi liquid [6].
The new accomplishments may also lead to deeper understanding of superfluidity (SN: 10/25/03, p.
Consider the well-known Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the context of superfluidity or superconductivity [21]:
Now, researchers in Canada have evidence for the onset of superfluidity in a droplet containing a mere seven atoms of liquid helium-4.
Leggett, a British-born scientist now at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, helped demystify another spectacular cryogenic phenomenon of some materials: superfluidity, or the ability of some fluids to flow without friction (SN: 9/23/00, p.