supernaturalism


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su·per·nat·u·ral·ism

 (so͞o′pər-năch′ər-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The quality of being supernatural.
2. Belief in a supernatural agency that intervenes in the course of natural laws.

su′per·nat′u·ral·ist n.
su′per·nat′u·ral·is′tic adj.

supernaturalism

(ˌsuːpəˈnætʃrəlɪzəm; -ˈnætʃərə-)
n
1. (Alternative Belief Systems) the quality or condition of being supernatural
2. (Alternative Belief Systems) a supernatural agency, the effects of which are felt to be apparent in this world
3. (Alternative Belief Systems) belief in supernatural forces or agencies as producing effects in this world
ˌsuperˈnaturalist n, adj
ˌsuperˌnaturalˈistic adj

su•per•nat•u•ral•ism

(ˌsu pərˈnætʃ ər əˌlɪz əm, -ˈnætʃ rə-)

n.
1. supernatural character or agency.
2. belief in the doctrine of supernatural or divine agency as manifested in the world.
[1790–1800]
su`per•nat′u•ral•ist, n., adj.
su`per•nat`u•ral•is′tic, adj.

supernaturalism

1. the condition or quality of existing outside the known experience of man or caused by forces beyond those of nature.
2. belief in supernatural events or forces. Also supranaturalism. — supernaturalist, n., adj. — supernatural, supernaturalistic, adj.
See also: Magic
1. the condition or quality of existing outside the known experience of man or caused by forces beyond those of nature.
2. belief in supernatural events or forces. Also supranaturalism.supernaturalist, n., adj.supernatural, supernaturalistic, adj.
See also: Ghosts
1. the condition or quality of existing outside the known experience of man or caused by forces beyond those of nature.
2. belief in supernatural events or forces. Also supranaturalism. — supernaturalist, n., adj.supernatural, supernaturalistic, adj.
See also: God and Gods
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.supernaturalism - a belief in forces beyond ordinary human understanding
belief - any cognitive content held as true
magic, thaumaturgy - any art that invokes supernatural powers
occultism - a belief in supernatural powers and the possibility of bringing them under human control
exorcism, dispossession - freeing from evil spirits
2.supernaturalism - the quality of being attributed to power that seems to violate or go beyond natural forces
unnaturalness - the quality of being unnatural or not based on natural principles
References in classic literature ?
Nor, in some things, does the common, hereditary experience of all mankind fail to bear witness to the supernaturalism of this hue.
His 'Ode on the Popular Superstitions of the Highlands,' further, was one of the earliest pieces of modern literature to return for inspiration to the store of medieval supernaturalism, in this case to Celtic supernaturalism.
Gillian Holroyd is one of the few modern people who can actually cast spells and perform feats of supernaturalism.
The realist novel injected with supernaturalism turns into fantasy, or a hybrid such as magical realism, but thereby loses its claim to veracity.
London, June 5 ( ANI ): An evolutionary biologist has claimed that fairy tales are harmful to children because they "inculcate a view of the world which includes supernaturalism.
Generally three perspectives on "Meaning of Life" are noticeable for theorists namely naturalism, supernaturalism and non-naturalism.
Sharp's Spinoza is as vexed by the 'subnaturalism' (3) of the latter view as the supernaturalism of the former.
The Yesnaby Stacks, Orkney A clifftop view that is so dramatic and, if you walk near the edge, so precarious, that its supernaturalism verges on the uneasy.
The authors' precluding supernaturalism or a creator God reveals a metaphysical naivete that ignores the possibility that the universe and natural laws are contingent, requiring a necessary being to maintain them in existence.
Moreover, supernaturalism plays a crucial and ambivalent role in the novel.
Historians might regard it as presentist because Kantor assessed the assumptions of past scholars on the basis of their degree of naturalism and supernaturalism (e.
Also of interest is David Leech's "Relating Spiritual Healing and Science," which helpfully explores the intellectual middle ground between scientific reductionism on the one hand and pure supernaturalism on the other.