supernova


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su·per·no·va

 (so͞o′pər-nō′və)
n. pl. su·per·no·vae (-vē) or su·per·no·vas
A rare celestial phenomenon involving the explosion of a star and resulting in an extremely bright, short-lived object that emits vast amounts of energy. Depending on the type of supernova, the explosion may completely destroy the star, or the stellar core may survive to become a neutron star.

supernova

(ˌsuːpəˈnəʊvə)
n, pl -vae (-viː) or -vas
(Astronomy) a star that explodes catastrophically owing to either instabilities following the exhaustion of its nuclear fuel or gravitational collapse following the accretion of matter from an orbiting companion star, becoming for a few days up to one hundred million times brighter than the sun. The expanding shell of debris (the supernova remnant) creates a nebula that radiates radio waves, X-rays, and light, for hundreds or thousands of years. Compare nova

su•per•no•va

(ˌsu pərˈnoʊ və)

n., pl. -vas, -vae (-vi)
a nova millions of times brighter than the sun.
[1925–30]

su·per·no·va

(so͞o′pər-nō′və)
Plural supernovae (so͞o′pər-nō′vē) or supernovas
A massive star that undergoes a sudden, extreme increase in brightness and releases an enormous burst of energy. This occurs as a result of the violent explosion of most of the material of the star, triggered by the collapse of its core. See more at star. Compare nova. See Note at pulsar.

supernova

A star that explodes and leaves a neutron star remnant.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.supernova - a star that explodes and becomes extremely luminous in the processsupernova - a star that explodes and becomes extremely luminous in the process
star - (astronomy) a celestial body of hot gases that radiates energy derived from thermonuclear reactions in the interior
Translations
supernova
supernowa

supernova

[ˌsuːpəˈnəʊvə] N (supernovae (pl)) [ˌsuːpəˈnəʊviː] (Astron) → supernova f

supernova

[ˌsuːpərˈnəʊvə] nsupernova f

supernova

n pl <-s or -e> → Supernova f

supernova

[ˌsuːpəˈnəʊvə] nsupernova
References in periodicals archive ?
Co-author Daniel Kasen from UC Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab created models of the supernova that explained the data as the explosion of a star only a few times the size of the sun and rich in carbon and oxygen.
Astronomers have discovered a new, milder class of supernova in which the star might survive the explosion.
While some researchers are puzzling over the supernova surplus, others propose a simple explanation.
Also, each supernova gives off a spectrum, or combination of wavelengths, of light.
In the order, the court confirmed that there already exists a rock and roll band called Supernova, an Orange County, California trio that contributed its song "Chewbacca" to the cult movie "Clerks.
However, there is a subset of particularly powerful supernovae, called superluminous supernova, that is rare and far more energetic than its regular counterpart.
Yet the material blasted outward from the explosion still glows hundreds or thousands of years later, forming a picturesque supernova remnant.
1 ( ANI ): Astronomers have deduced that sometime during the next 50 years, a supernova occurring in Milky Way galaxy is going to be visible from Earth.
INSPIRED BY THE DESIRE to probe the universe's expansion history, several robotic supernova searches over the past 20 years have greatly increased the discovery rate of exploding stars.
It will be fascinating to compare Riess' supernova findings with other Hubble data now being analyzed, which were recorded from equally distant supernovas, notes Linder.
SAN DIEGO -- Supernova -- an Orange County, California rock and roll band that contributed its song "Chewbacca" to the cult movie "Clerks" -- has filed for a preliminary injunction to halt the band being formed on the CBS television series "Rock Star: Supernova" from performing or recording under the name "Supernova" alone.
A massive star 10 billion light-years from Earth exploded in a supernova and its brightness was more than three times that of all the 100 billion stars of the Milky Way galaxy put together.