supernova

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Related to supernovas: neutron star, Black holes

su·per·no·va

 (so͞o′pər-nō′və)
n. pl. su·per·no·vae (-vē) or su·per·no·vas
A rare celestial phenomenon involving the explosion of a star and resulting in an extremely bright, short-lived object that emits vast amounts of energy. Depending on the type of supernova, the explosion may completely destroy the star, or the stellar core may survive to become a neutron star.

supernova

(ˌsuːpəˈnəʊvə)
n, pl -vae (-viː) or -vas
(Astronomy) a star that explodes catastrophically owing to either instabilities following the exhaustion of its nuclear fuel or gravitational collapse following the accretion of matter from an orbiting companion star, becoming for a few days up to one hundred million times brighter than the sun. The expanding shell of debris (the supernova remnant) creates a nebula that radiates radio waves, X-rays, and light, for hundreds or thousands of years. Compare nova

su•per•no•va

(ˌsu pərˈnoʊ və)

n., pl. -vas, -vae (-vi)
a nova millions of times brighter than the sun.
[1925–30]

su·per·no·va

(so͞o′pər-nō′və)
Plural supernovae (so͞o′pər-nō′vē) or supernovas
A massive star that undergoes a sudden, extreme increase in brightness and releases an enormous burst of energy. This occurs as a result of the violent explosion of most of the material of the star, triggered by the collapse of its core. See more at star. Compare nova. See Note at pulsar.

supernova

A star that explodes and leaves a neutron star remnant.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.supernova - a star that explodes and becomes extremely luminous in the processsupernova - a star that explodes and becomes extremely luminous in the process
star - (astronomy) a celestial body of hot gases that radiates energy derived from thermonuclear reactions in the interior
Translations
supernova
supernowa

supernova

[ˌsuːpəˈnəʊvə] N (supernovae (pl)) [ˌsuːpəˈnəʊviː] (Astron) → supernova f

supernova

[ˌsuːpərˈnəʊvə] nsupernova f

supernova

n pl <-s or -e> → Supernova f

supernova

[ˌsuːpəˈnəʊvə] nsupernova
References in periodicals archive ?
Livio says that if eruptions such as those of Eta Carinae were common among the most-massive stars, "it may change significantly the [assumed] end products of those stars, including black holes and supernovas.
With so much data collected, the observations of SN 2011fe will serve as the standard against which other supernovas will be judged.
If that rate of dust expulsion is typical, it would suggest that core-collapse supernovas have been major producers of dust throughout cosmic history.
A small fraction of core-collapse supernovas produce gamma-ray bursts (SN: 5/17/03, p.
Isn't that because gamma-ray bursts from core-collapse supernovas are directional, along the axis of rotation?
An exploding star recently discovered in a nearby galaxy may be a milestone in the study of type 1a supernovas.
Isobel Hook of the University of Oxford in England and her colleagues identified 71 of these supernovas in images taken by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope atop Hawaii's Mauna Kea.
High-resolution X-ray images now offer evidence that shock waves from that and other supernovas generate most of the cosmic rays that bombard Earth.
In core-collapse supernovas, this core, which is called a neutron star, then rapidly generates a stream of subatomic particles that blows away the star's outer layers.
Scientists consider stellar explosions, called supernovas, the blast furnaces in which about half of all heavy elements found in nature today were, and continue to be, forged.
By analyzing the spectra of HE1327-2326, the team may be seeing fingerprints of the earlier stars' supernovas, says Frebel.
Since the 1930s, astronomers have referred to such brilliant explosions as supernovas.