superorganism


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su·per·or·gan·ism

 (so͞o′pər-ôr′gə-nĭz′əm)
n.
A group of organisms, such as an insect colony, that functions in an organized fashion analogous in some ways to the functioning of a single biological organism.

superorganism

(ˈsuːpərˌɔːɡənɪzəm)
n
(Biology) a group of organisms functioning as one organism (e.g. an insect colony)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Superorganism lead the way here - their debut album (out last week) is a curious collection of wonky electro-pop and like nothing else I've ever heard.
New indie band Superorganism is making all the right noises.
The answer is that together, we make a superorganism.
Nearly all of Superorganism, a new eight-person pop group, has lived there since 2015: Harry, who also plays guitar in the live band; Emily, who writes, produces, and handles synths; singers Ruby and B; a visual artist named Robert; and Tucan, who helps with writing and production.
What we experience as upheaval is leaving behind more primitive versions of human communities to create a new, more inclusive version where each human is a "cell" in the evolving superorganism, humanity.
The difference between a superorganism and a real organism is that we retain our individuality; there is no central unit taking decisions on behalf of all of us, we are all free.
Together, humans and our microbiome have been collectively described as a superorganism (Hattori and Taylor 2009; Sleator 2010) or, more accurately, a holobiont (Gordon et al.
Or is this merely the technology of an advanced phase of informational capitalism, now functioning as a superorganism in which individual 'choices' merely sustain and reproduce the system itself?
He has simply shoved together two anomalous pieces: the egoistic isolate that makes up, supposedly, 90 percent of human motives and the superorganism that makes up the other 10 percent.
Many shades with several LED circuits apiece make up this superorganism of lighting.
In the attempt to reimagine globalized environmental catastrophes, Wu's novel has become an essential part of the rising global interest in what Joni Adamson calls an "indigenous cosmovision" (148) or what environmental Bron Taylor names a "dark green religion" (4) and that configure environmental globality as a "multinatural" superorganism (Adamson 146) or a "Gaia-like superorganism" (Taylor 4) of wholeness and spiritual connectedness.