superposition


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

su·per·po·si·tion

 (so͞o′pər-pə-zĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The act of superposing or the state of being superposed: "Yet another technique in the forensic specialist's repertoire is photo superposition" (Patrick Nuyghe).
2. Geology The principle that in a group of stratified sedimentary rocks the lowest were the earliest to be deposited.
3. Physics The combination of two or more physical states, such as waves, to form a new physical state in accordance with the superposition principle.
tr.v. su·per·po·si·tioned, su·per·po·si·tion·ing, su·per·po·si·tions
To superpose.

superposition

(ˌsuːpəpəˈzɪʃən)
n
1. the act of superposing or state of being superposed
2. (Geological Science) geology the principle that in any sequence of sedimentary rocks which has not been disturbed, the oldest strata lie at the bottom and the youngest at the top

su•per•po•si•tion

(ˌsu pər pəˈzɪʃ ən)

n.
the order in which sedimentary strata are superposed one above another.
[1790–1800; < French; see super-, position]

superposition

The principle that, in undisturbed layered rocks, the higher a stratum, the younger it is.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.superposition - (geology) the deposition of one geological stratum on another
geology - a science that deals with the history of the earth as recorded in rocks
deposition, deposit - the natural process of laying down a deposit of something
2.superposition - (geology) the principle that in a series of stratified sedimentary rocks the lowest stratum is the oldest
principle, rule - a rule or law concerning a natural phenomenon or the function of a complex system; "the principle of the conservation of mass"; "the principle of jet propulsion"; "the right-hand rule for inductive fields"
geology - a science that deals with the history of the earth as recorded in rocks
3.superposition - (geometry) the placement of one object ideally in the position of another one in order to show that the two coincide
locating, positioning, emplacement, location, placement, position - the act of putting something in a certain place
geometry - the pure mathematics of points and lines and curves and surfaces
4.superposition - the placement of one thing on top of another
locating, positioning, emplacement, location, placement, position - the act of putting something in a certain place
Translations

superposition

[ˈsuːpəpəzɪʃən] Nsuperposición f
References in classic literature ?
In addition to external observable habits (including the habit of words), there is also the generic image produced by the superposition, or, in Semon's phrase, homophony, of a number of similar perceptions.
What really sets a quantum computer apart from a regular digital computer is the fundamental nature of how data is encoded via quantum properties like superposition or entanglement.
technical value detailed planning -proposal of planning optimization (planning baton with superposition of spots) 15% -
But a quantum computer's bits - which are known as quantum bits or qubits - can have two different values at the same time, known as being in a superposition.
Mode superposition introduced to the analytical model enables to significantly reduce the model order and, consequently the time step of real-time computations with only unnoticeable decrease of accuracy (if the reduction is performed correctly).
The majority is based on a superposition of two oscillations with different frequencies and phases.
The new color is produced by a superposition of at least two color series.
This combination is naturally considered as a superposition of Gaussian noise over Poisson noise.
An article from the Economist briefly summarizes the processes of high-speed quantum computing: Superposition breaks down bits into qubits - a conventional computer can work in one of 16 states at a time while the quantum computer can work with all 16 at once.
A quantum computer is a computer that uses quantum-mechanical techniques, such as entanglement and superposition, to process data.
In this paper, transmission loss and insertion loss are defined for multiple inlet and outlet muffers using a superposition method that can be extended to any m-inlet n-outlet muffer.
Simmons proposes in this book that two major concepts out of contemporary quantum physics, namely, entanglement or relational holism and superposition or complementarity, could well serve as guiding metaphors for understanding a "perichoretic" relation between God and the world.