superposition


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su·per·po·si·tion

 (so͞o′pər-pə-zĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The act of superposing or the state of being superposed: "Yet another technique in the forensic specialist's repertoire is photo superposition" (Patrick Nuyghe).
2. Geology The principle that in a group of stratified sedimentary rocks the lowest were the earliest to be deposited.
3. Physics The combination of two or more physical states, such as waves, to form a new physical state in accordance with the superposition principle.
tr.v. su·per·po·si·tioned, su·per·po·si·tion·ing, su·per·po·si·tions
To superpose.

superposition

(ˌsuːpəpəˈzɪʃən)
n
1. the act of superposing or state of being superposed
2. (Geological Science) geology the principle that in any sequence of sedimentary rocks which has not been disturbed, the oldest strata lie at the bottom and the youngest at the top

su•per•po•si•tion

(ˌsu pər pəˈzɪʃ ən)

n.
the order in which sedimentary strata are superposed one above another.
[1790–1800; < French; see super-, position]

superposition

The principle that, in undisturbed layered rocks, the higher a stratum, the younger it is.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.superposition - (geology) the deposition of one geological stratum on another
geology - a science that deals with the history of the earth as recorded in rocks
deposition, deposit - the natural process of laying down a deposit of something
2.superposition - (geology) the principle that in a series of stratified sedimentary rocks the lowest stratum is the oldest
principle, rule - a rule or law concerning a natural phenomenon or the function of a complex system; "the principle of the conservation of mass"; "the principle of jet propulsion"; "the right-hand rule for inductive fields"
geology - a science that deals with the history of the earth as recorded in rocks
3.superposition - (geometry) the placement of one object ideally in the position of another one in order to show that the two coincide
locating, positioning, emplacement, location, placement, position - the act of putting something in a certain place
geometry - the pure mathematics of points and lines and curves and surfaces
4.superposition - the placement of one thing on top of another
locating, positioning, emplacement, location, placement, position - the act of putting something in a certain place
Translations

superposition

[ˈsuːpəpəzɪʃən] Nsuperposición f
References in classic literature ?
In addition to external observable habits (including the habit of words), there is also the generic image produced by the superposition, or, in Semon's phrase, homophony, of a number of similar perceptions.
Simmons proposes two major concepts out of contemporary quantum physics, namely, entanglement or relational holism and superposition or complementarity.
Qubits can be 0,1 or a blend of both simultaneously, a phenomenon called superposition that enables quantum computers to perform certain calculations more efficiently.
The objective of the Fellowships are at Early and Established career stage academics whose research centers on the direct exploitation of quantum phenomena, such as superposition or entanglement, to address the challenges of translation of quantum science via technology to eventual applications.
The semiempirical WLF equation [17, 18], one of the most famous approaches using time-temperature superposition principle (TTSP), was extended by Luo et al.
viewed different worlds in different quantum mechanics and the superposition of a particle be liked those separate arms of a branching universe ([15], also see [1]).
However, a quantum bit (qubit) can hold a value of I or 0 as well as both values at the same time, described as superposition and simply denoted as "0+1 The sign of this superposition is important because both states 0 and I have a phase relationship to each other.
However, a quantum bit (qubit) can hold a value of 1 or 0 as well as both values at the same time, described as superposition and simply denoted as "0+1".
Physicists speak of quantum superposition of different paths.
the Superposition Borehole Model (SBM), the Duct Heat Storage model (DST) and the type 451a based on a previous version of the EWS (ErdWarmeSonde) program.
trouble with qubits is that when actively measured they lose the superposition
There are two established models that describe the relationship between reaction rate and temperature: the Arrhenius relation and time-temperature superposition.