supersede


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su·per·sede

also su·per·cede  (so͞o′pər-sēd′)
tr.v. su·per·sed·ed, su·per·sed·ing, su·per·sedes or su·per·ced·ed or su·per·ced·ing or su·per·cedes
1. To take the place of; replace or supplant: "[Dean] Acheson's conversion, that military force should supersede diplomatic response as the core of U.S. foreign policy, would reverberate across generations" (James Carroll).
2. To take the place of (a person), as in an office or position; succeed. See Synonyms at replace.

[Late Middle English (Scottish) superceden, to postpone, defer, from Old French superceder, from Latin supersedēre, to sit on top of, abstain from : super-, super- + sedēre, to sit; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

su′per·sed′er, su′per·ced′er n.
su′per·ses′sion, su′per·ces′sion (-sĕsh′ən) n.
Usage Note: Supersede is commonly spelled supercede, probably by influence of words like accede and intercede. The spelling with a c has been in existence for 300 years and has traditionally been considered an error, but it appears so widely in books and other edited publications that this spelling must be considered standard.

supersede

(ˌsuːpəˈsiːd)
vb (tr)
1. to take the place of (something old-fashioned or less appropriate); supplant
2. to replace in function, office, etc; succeed
3. to discard or set aside or cause to be set aside as obsolete or inferior
[C15: via Old French from Latin supersedēre to sit above, from super- + sedēre to sit]
ˌsuperˈsedable adj
ˌsuperˈsedence n
ˌsuperˈseder n
supersedure n
supersession n

su•per•sede

(ˌsu pərˈsid)

v.t. -sed•ed, -sed•ing.
1. to replace in power, authority, effectiveness, acceptance, use, etc., as by another person or thing.
2. to set aside or cause to be set aside as void, useless, or obsolete, usu. in favor of something mentioned; make obsolete.
3. to succeed to the position, function, office, etc., of; supplant.
[1485–95; < Latin supersedēre to sit on top, refrain =super- super- + sedēre to sit]
su`per•sed′a•ble, adj.
su`per•sed′er, n.

supersede


Past participle: superseded
Gerund: superseding

Imperative
supersede
supersede
Present
I supersede
you supersede
he/she/it supersedes
we supersede
you supersede
they supersede
Preterite
I superseded
you superseded
he/she/it superseded
we superseded
you superseded
they superseded
Present Continuous
I am superseding
you are superseding
he/she/it is superseding
we are superseding
you are superseding
they are superseding
Present Perfect
I have superseded
you have superseded
he/she/it has superseded
we have superseded
you have superseded
they have superseded
Past Continuous
I was superseding
you were superseding
he/she/it was superseding
we were superseding
you were superseding
they were superseding
Past Perfect
I had superseded
you had superseded
he/she/it had superseded
we had superseded
you had superseded
they had superseded
Future
I will supersede
you will supersede
he/she/it will supersede
we will supersede
you will supersede
they will supersede
Future Perfect
I will have superseded
you will have superseded
he/she/it will have superseded
we will have superseded
you will have superseded
they will have superseded
Future Continuous
I will be superseding
you will be superseding
he/she/it will be superseding
we will be superseding
you will be superseding
they will be superseding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been superseding
you have been superseding
he/she/it has been superseding
we have been superseding
you have been superseding
they have been superseding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been superseding
you will have been superseding
he/she/it will have been superseding
we will have been superseding
you will have been superseding
they will have been superseding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been superseding
you had been superseding
he/she/it had been superseding
we had been superseding
you had been superseding
they had been superseding
Conditional
I would supersede
you would supersede
he/she/it would supersede
we would supersede
you would supersede
they would supersede
Past Conditional
I would have superseded
you would have superseded
he/she/it would have superseded
we would have superseded
you would have superseded
they would have superseded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.supersede - take the place or move into the position of; "Smith replaced Miller as CEO after Miller left"; "the computer has supplanted the slide rule"; "Mary replaced Susan as the team's captain and the highest-ranked player in the school"
replace - substitute a person or thing for (another that is broken or inefficient or lost or no longer working or yielding what is expected); "He replaced the old razor blade"; "We need to replace the secretary that left a month ago"; "the insurance will replace the lost income"; "This antique vase can never be replaced"
put back, replace - put something back where it belongs; "replace the book on the shelf after you have finished reading it"; "please put the clean dishes back in the cabinet when you have washed them"
deputise, deputize, step in, substitute - act as a substitute; "She stood in for the soprano who suffered from a cold"
displace, preempt - take the place of or have precedence over; "live broadcast of the presidential debate preempts the regular news hour"; "discussion of the emergency situation will preempt the lecture by the professor"
usurp - take the place of; "gloom had usurped mirth at the party after the news of the terrorist act broke"
oust - remove and replace; "The word processor has ousted the typewriter"
come after, succeed, follow - be the successor (of); "Carter followed Ford"; "Will Charles succeed to the throne?"

supersede

verb replace, displace, usurp, supplant, remove, take over, oust, take the place of, fill or step into (someone's) boots Madness follows, and the birth of a son who will supersede him.

supersede

verb
To substitute for or fill the place of:
Translations

supersede

[ˌsuːpəˈsiːd] VTdesbancar, suplantar

supersede

[ˌsuːpərˈsiːd] vtremplacer, supplanter

supersede

vtablösen; person, belief alsoan die Stelle treten von

supersede

[ˌsuːpəˈsiːd] vtsostituire, soppiantare
a superseded method → un metodo sorpassato
References in classic literature ?
I have always thought, that one of the most curious and valuable objects of antiquaries has been to trace the progress of society, by the efforts made in early ages to improve the rudeness of their first expedients, until they either approach excellence, or, as is more frequently the case, are supplied by new and fundamental discoveries, which supersede both the earlier and ruder system, and the improvements which have been ingrafted upon it.
An insular situation, and a powerful marine, guarding it in a great measure against the possibility of foreign invasion, supersede the necessity of a numerous army within the kingdom.
He pointed out-- writing in a foolish, facetious tone--that the perfection of mechanical appliances must ultimately supersede limbs; the perfection of chemical devices, digestion; that such organs as hair, external nose, teeth, ears, and chin were no longer essential parts of the human being, and that the tendency of natural selection would lie in the direction of their steady diminution through the coming ages.
Could I but stand by his side, in the light of day, with the same strength that I had when I killed the bravest of our foes upon the plain of Troy--could I but be as I then was and go even for a short time to my father's house, any one who tried to do him violence or supersede him would soon rue it.
This diversity of opinion, on a subject of which one would think none of us very well qualified to be judges, was owing to a circumstance of such every-day occurrence as almost to supersede the necessity of telling it, though the narrative would be rendered more complete by an explanation.
Tim, thinking slightly of David's vocalization, was impelled to supersede that feeble buzz by a spirited commencement of "Three Merry Mowers," but David was not to be put down so easily, and showed himself capable of a copious crescendo, which was rendering it doubtful whether the rose would not predominate over the mowers, when old Kester, with an entirely unmoved and immovable aspect, suddenly set up a quavering treble--as if he had been an alarum, and the time was come for him to go off.
This operation appeared to me to be the most laborious species of work performed in Typee; and had I possessed a sufficient intimacy with the language to have conveyed my ideas upon the subject, I should certainly have suggested to the most influential of the natives the expediency of establishing a college of vestals to be centrally located in the valley, for the purpose of keeping alive the indispensable article of fire; so as to supersede the necessity of such a vast outlay of strength and good temper, as were usually squandered on these occasions.
Believe me the single word of Langford is not of such potent intelligence as to supersede the necessity of more.
He grazed his cattle on these slopes, and he learned to dig for tin when the bronze sword began to supersede the stone axe.
He supposes all his dependents to be utterly bereft of individual characters, intentions, or opinions, and is persuaded that he was born to supersede the necessity of their having any.
This brief account of the family is intended to supersede the necessity of a long and minute detail from Mrs.
When those who have the deliberative power elect each other, and the son succeeds to the father, and when they can supersede the laws, such a government is of necessity a strict oligarchy.