supplication


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sup·pli·cate

 (sŭp′lĭ-kāt′)
v. sup·pli·cat·ed, sup·pli·cat·ing, sup·pli·cates
v.tr.
1. To ask for humbly or earnestly, as by praying.
2. To make a humble entreaty to; beseech.
v.intr.
To make a humble, earnest petition; beg.

[Middle English supplicaten, from Latin supplicāre, supplicāt-, from supplex, supplic-, suppliant; see supple.]

sup′pli·ca′tion n.
sup′pli·ca·to′ry (-kə-tôr′ē) adj.

supplication

(ˌsʌplɪˈkeɪʃən)
n
1. the act of supplicating
2. a humble entreaty or petition; prayer
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.supplication - a prayer asking God's help as part of a religious servicesupplication - a prayer asking God's help as part of a religious service
divine service, religious service, service - the act of public worship following prescribed rules; "the Sunday service"
orison, petition, prayer - reverent petition to a deity
rogation - a solemn supplication ceremony prescribed by the church
2.supplication - a humble request for help from someone in authoritysupplication - a humble request for help from someone in authority
appeal, entreaty, prayer - earnest or urgent request; "an entreaty to stop the fighting"; "an appeal for help"; "an appeal to the public to keep calm"
3.supplication - the act of communicating with a deity (especially as a petition or in adoration or contrition or thanksgiving)supplication - the act of communicating with a deity (especially as a petition or in adoration or contrition or thanksgiving); "the priest sank to his knees in prayer"
worship - the activity of worshipping
devotion - (usually plural) religious observance or prayers (usually spoken silently); "he returned to his devotions"
benediction, blessing - the act of praying for divine protection

supplication

noun (Formal) plea, appeal, prayer, pleading, request, petition, invocation, solicitation, entreaty He raised his arms in a gesture of supplication.

supplication

noun
1. An earnest or urgent request:
2. The act of praying:
Translations
تَوَسُّل، تَضَرُّع
prosba
bønfaldelsetryglen
auîmjúk bæn; bón, beiîni
lūgšanalūgums
yalvarma

supplication

[ˌsʌplɪˈkeɪʃən] Nsúplica f

supplication

nFlehen nt no pl

supplication

[ˌsʌplɪˈkeɪʃn] n (frm) → supplica

supplication

(sapliˈkeiʃən) noun
(an) earnest prayer or entreaty.
References in classic literature ?
with visage uplifted to the gray sky in an agony of supplication.
His face gave again, round the room, its convulsed supplication.
When gliding by the Bashee isles we emerged at last upon the great South Sea; were it not for other things, I could have greeted my dear Pacific with uncounted thanks, for now the long supplication of my youth was answered; that serene ocean rolled eastwards from me a thousand leagues of blue.
But re- member -- ah, good friend, I implore thee remember my supplication, and do the blessed sun no hurt.
Tom's mother entered now, closing the door behind her, and approached her son with all the wheedling and supplication servilities that fear and interest can impart to the words and attitudes of the born slave.
This lock of hair, which now he can so readily give up, was begged of me with the most earnest supplication.
Reed spurned my wild supplication for pardon, and locked me a second time in the dark and haunted chamber.
And on their behalf he added that night a special prayer to the usual quarter-of-an-hour's supplication before meat, and would have tacked another to the end of the grace, had not his young mistress broken in upon him with a hurried command that he must run down the road, and, wherever Heathcliff had rambled, find and make him re-enter directly!
The last supplication but one I make to you, is, that you will believe this of me.
He rose: but finding that the Spirit made towards the window, clasped his robe in supplication.
She dropped her face on my old nurse's breast, and, ceasing this supplication, which in its agony and grief was half a woman's, half a child's, as all her manner was (being, in that, more natural, and better suited to her beauty, as I thought, than any other manner could have been), wept silently, while my old nurse hushed her like an infant.
Our puissance is our own, our own right hand Shall teach us highest deeds, by proof to try Who is our equal: then thou shalt behold Whether by supplication we intend Address, and to begirt th' Almighty Throne Beseeching or besieging.