suppressiveness

suppressiveness

(səˈprɛsɪvnəs)
n
the quality of being suppressive
References in periodicals archive ?
The establishment and maintenance of these beneficial microorganisms in the soil must be achieved year after year, because in this way biocontrol agents are established and reproducing, thus increasing the soil suppressiveness.
Therefore, the improvements of Chuju yields by bio-organic fertilizer in both trial 1 and trial 2 would be due to the suppressiveness of fungal pathogens.
Root zone microflora is responsible for suppressiveness of the white root rot disease in Akwete Rubber Plantations.
Effect of Pseudomonas putida and a Synthetic Iron Chelator on Induction of Soil Suppressiveness to Fusarium Wilt Pathogens.
Previous research has demonstrated that the effects of gypsum and limestone soil applications during root development of avocado trees are a consequence of changes on soil chemical and physical properties induced by both compounds as they enhance soil infiltration and internal drainage, and to increase soil suppressiveness on the growth of P.
Since soil microbial biomass flourishes better in a medium rich in organic matter, organic or inorganic soil amendments may increase soil suppressiveness to Striga hermonthica and also improve soil conditions to increase yield of subsequent cereal.
Microbial populations responsible for specific soil suppressiveness to plant pathogens.
622349 Kotsou M, Mari I, Lasaridi K, Chatzipavlidis I, Balis C, Kyriacou A (2004) The effect of olive oil mill wastewater (OMW) on soil microbial communities and suppressiveness against Rhizoctonia solani.
Vinale F, Sivasithamparam K, Ghisalberti EL, Marra R, Woo SL, Termorshuizen M, Van Rijn AJ, Van der Gaag DJ, Alabouvette C, Chen Y, Lagerlof J, Malandrakis A, Paplomatas EJ, Ramert B, Ryckeboer J, Steinberg C, Zmora-Nahum S (2006) Suppressiveness of 18 composts against 7 pathosystems: Variability in pathogen response.
28] noted that two probable mechanisms of action in terms of phytopathogen suppressiveness were proposed regarding fungal pathogen: (a) mycoparasitism, which involved direct contact between the tested antagonist and the pathogen on the plate whereby a reduction in the pathogen biomass was also observed and subsequent antagonist growth to reduce the pathogen and (b) production of microbial antibiotic, which may spread through the medium, leaving a clear band that separates the antagonist from the pathogen.
However, Scher and Baker (1980) and Kao and Ko (1983), aiming to identify the effects of methyl bromide in soil, have found that soil treatment with this gas kills pathogenic fungal spores, affecting the soil suppressiveness, a quality that promotes plant growth because the microbiota are efficient in the use of organic sources, oxygen and, especially, minerals.