supralapsarian

supralapsarian

(ˌsuːprəlæpˈsɛərɪən; ˌsjuː-)
n
(Theology) Christian theol a person who believes that God decreed the election or nonelection of individuals to salvation even before the Fall. Compare infralapsarian
[C17: from New Latin suprālapsārius, from Latin supra- + lapsus a fall]
ˌsupralapˈsarianism n
References in classic literature ?
Supralapsarians, who hold that that luckless person's fall was decreed
43) Edwin Van Driel, Incarnation Anyway: Arguments for Supralapsarian Christology (New York: Oxford University Press, 2008).
This "aesthetic" view fits well with Alvin Plantinga's recent version of the argument from supralapsarian metaphysics.
Perkins's supralapsarian and atonement-limiting version of Reformed theology, which Moore dubs "strict Elizabethan particularism" (68), led Perkins to deny that the call of the gospel for sinners to believe implied that God desired to save the reprobate.
As Shami shows, Donne accepts the biblical teaching of predestination, but rejects supralapsarian interpretations, and critiques "those who divorce [this] doctrine from its implementation through Christ and his ordinances" (95).
33) This, so called, supralapsarian view, gives an absolute priority to the decree of predestination from which all the other decrees stem from.
He did not want a visible church to hold doctrines on original sin or on Calvin's supralapsarian predestination because they make a tyrant of God.
Vos brings out clearly the supralapsarian perspective framing Scotus's doctrine.
In this lively and concise Yale dissertation van Driel moves dialectically through the supralapsarian Christologies of Friedrich Schleiermacher, I.
As a supralapsarian, he believed God set out His eternal purpose before sin was committed.
Holland's insistence on the sovereign right to determine its own liberal religious policy united an insuperable array of forces against it: the Staathouder, Maurice of Orange, who had an interest in a united Netherlands; other member-states of the United Provinces, who had an interest in controlling their strongest partner; the predominantly supralapsarian leadership of the Reformed Church, which wanted a synod to enforce its peculiar conception of orthodoxy; and finally, though initially sympathetic, King James of Scotland and England, who had an interest in keeping the Netherlands quiet.
Originally presented as the 2000 Stob Lectures at Calvin College and Calvin Theological Seminary, the book moves quickly through the topics, the importance of common grace as a resource for theologians today, how God relates to the unelect, the impact of the debate between infralapsarian and supralapsarian positions, and finally the common good and how theories of common grace might profitably be updated.