suprematist


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Related to suprematist: Kazimir Malevich

su·prem·a·tism

 (so͝o-prĕm′ə-tĭz′əm)
n.
A school and theory of geometric abstract art that originated in Russia in the early 1900s and influenced constructivism.

[Russian suprematizm, from French suprématie, supremacy, from supremacy.]

su·prem′a·tist adj. & n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.suprematist - an artist of the school of suprematismsuprematist - an artist of the school of suprematism
abstract artist, abstractionist - a painter of abstract pictures
References in periodicals archive ?
Later, in a marvellous essay on Stephen Bambury (2000), and discussing the as it were transactional relation between Bambury and the Black Square (1915) of the Russian Suprematist Vladimir Malevich, Curnow notes that, 'the meaning of the work (Black Square) is largely contextual, dependent upon our bringing to it some local knowledge'--some story, even, dare I say.
LONDON: CURATED BY ACHIM BORCHARDT-HUME) With difficult loans and extraordinary historical finds, this survey of the Suprematist icon was simply excellent, using thorough research to document Malevich's influence as a teacher and thoughtfully tell the story of his late return to figuration.
The results are at times reminiscent of Suprematist compositions.
He cites sculptor Tony Smith, Suprematist founder Kazimir Malevich and ceramist Masamichi Yoshikawa as influences.
The exhibition will demonstrate the shift in emphasis from the "nave" folklore themes in his early work towards an understanding of how he combined Fauve, Cubist, Expressionist and Suprematist styles while expressing his native Jewish Russian culture.
His ethnic identity is conspicuously incongruous: he is a Russian (Malevich), a European (expressionist brushstrokes and pouring), an Arab Muslim, with his scimitar dangling below his Suprematist breastplate.
The Hutaree are a group of white suprematist Hitler wannabees who have been arrested recently.
By examining the use of the iconography tradition in Potemkin, this analysis will fulfill Bartlett's suggestion that an investigation similar to Ksana Blank's "Lev Tolstoy's Suprematist Icon-Painting," in which Blank analyzes Tolstoy's use of Orthodox iconography tradition in his writing, should be applied to Eisenstein's work (74).
His "Proun" period (1919-24) included works on wood or paper that featured the Suprematist shapes of Malevich which, when combined with Lissitsky's background in engineering and architecture, emerged as outlines for future building projects.
Puni painted several delightful Suprematist figures in gouache on postcards and designed and assembled an extraordinary artist's book of collage, gouache and cut letters.
For example, good and bad guys almost literally wear white and black hats in the showdown between Russian suprematist painter Malevich (of the white on white canvases) and his Stirner-quoting rival painter Rodchenko (of the black on black ones) at Russia's 1919 "Tenth State Exhibition of Nonobjective Creation and Suprematism.
Chronologically structured, the show tracks her progress from the mind-blowing paintings of the Peak Club (who had ever heard of suprematist geology before?