surcoat

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sur·coat

 (sûr′kōt′)
n.
1. A loose outer coat or gown.
2. A tunic worn in the Middle Ages by a knight over his armor.

[Middle English surcote, from Old French : sur-, sur- + cote, coat; see coat.]

surcoat

(ˈsɜːˌkəʊt)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a tunic, often embroidered with heraldic arms, worn by a knight over his armour during the Middle Ages
2. (Clothing & Fashion) an outer coat or other garment

sur•coat

(ˈsɜrˌkoʊt)

n.
1. a garment worn over medieval armor, often embroidered with heraldic arms.
2. an outer coat or other outer garment.
[1300–50; Middle English surcote < Middle French. See sur-1, coat]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.surcoat - a loose outer coat usually of rich materialsurcoat - a loose outer coat usually of rich material
coat - an outer garment that has sleeves and covers the body from shoulder down; worn outdoors
2.surcoat - a tunic worn over a knight's armor
tunic - any of a variety of loose fitting cloaks extending to the hips or knees
References in classic literature ?
With the reader's consent, we will endeavor to retrace in thought, the impression which he would have experienced in company with us on crossing the threshold of that grand hall, in the midst of that tumultuous crowd in surcoats, short, sleeveless jackets, and doublets.
He was a darkly-tanned, burly, good-natured, fine-looking man, of sixty or thereabouts, dressed in a spacious roundabout, that hung round him in festoons of blue pilot-cloth; and one empty arm of this jacket streamed behind him like the broidered arm of a huzzar's surcoat.
Here, in gold-embroidered red doublet, jewelled surcoat, and gilt-edged ruff and wristbands, stood Sir Anthony Sherard, with his silver-and-black armour piled at his feet.
Over his armour he wore a surcoat or cassock of what seemed to be the finest cloth of gold, all bespangled with glittering mirrors like little moons, which gave him an extremely gallant and splendid appearance; above his helmet fluttered a great quantity of plumes, green, yellow, and white, and his lance, which was leaning against a tree, was very long and stout, and had a steel point more than a palm in length.
The doctor had been no less carefully armed and accoutered by his housekeeper, the vigilant Frau Ilsy, and sallied forth in his camlet robe by way of surcoat,[1] his black velvet cap under his cocked hat, a thick clasped book under his arm, a basket of drugs and dried herbs in one hand, and in the other the miraculous rod of divination.
The fourth was a meek- looking, long-visaged man, without any other protection from the cold than that which was furnished by a black surcoat, made with some little formality, but which was rather threadbare and rusty.
They wear a capot or surcoat, made of a blanket, a striped cotton shirt, cloth trousers, or leathern leggins, moccasins of deer-skin, and a belt of variegated worsted, from which are suspended the knife, tobacco-pouch, and other implements.