surplice


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sur·plice

 (sûr′plĭs)
n.
A loose-fitting, white ecclesiastical gown with wide sleeves, worn over a cassock.
adj.
Designating a garment with a V-shaped neckline in which fabric from one side of the garment diagonally overlaps fabric from the other side before being sown together.

[Middle English surplis, from Anglo-Norman surpliz, variant of Old French sourpeliz, from Medieval Latin superpellīcium : Latin super-, super- + Medieval Latin pellīcium, fur coat (from Latin, neuter of pellīcius, made of skin, from pellis, skin; see pel- in Indo-European roots).]

surplice

(ˈsɜːplɪs)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) a loose wide-sleeved liturgical vestment of linen, reaching to the knees, worn over the cassock by clergymen, choristers, and acolytes
[C13: via Anglo-French from Old French sourpelis, from Medieval Latin superpellīcium, from super- + pellīcium coat made of skins, from Latin pellis a skin]
ˈsurpliced adj

sur•plice

(ˈsɜr plɪs)

n.
1. a loose-fitting, broad-sleeved white vestment worn over a cassock.
2. a garment in which the two halves of the front cross diagonally.
adj.
3. designating, forming, or having a closure with diagonally crossing halves:a surplice neckline.
[1250–1300; Middle English surplis < Anglo-French surpliz, Old French surpeliz < Medieval Latin superpellīcium (vestīmentum) literally, (garment) worn over furs]
sur′pliced, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.surplice - a loose-fitting white ecclesiastical vestment with wide sleevessurplice - a loose-fitting white ecclesiastical vestment with wide sleeves
vestment - gown (especially ceremonial garments) worn by the clergy
Translations

surplice

[ˈsɜːpləs] Nsobrepelliz f

surplice

nChorrock m, → Chorhemd nt

surplice

[ˈsɜːpləs] n (Rel) → cotta
References in classic literature ?
Wood is in the vestry, sir, putting on his surplice.
I could as easy steal the parson's surplice, and wear it.
The other exhibited him at full length, adorned in his surplice.
Immediately afterwards, the clergyman appeared: putting on his surplice as he came along.
The idea of Edward's being a clergyman, and living in a small parsonage-house, diverted him beyond measure;--and when to that was added the fanciful imagery of Edward reading prayers in a white surplice, and publishing the banns of marriage between John Smith and Mary Brown, he could conceive nothing more ridiculous.
and Gondy, in surplice and cloak, appeared, moving tranquilly in the midst of the fusillade and bestowing his benedictions to the right and left, as undisturbed as if he were leading a procession of the Fete Dieu.
Josiah Graves thereupon resigned all his offices, and that very evening sent to the church for his cassock and surplice.
Between them an elderly, gray-bearded man, wearing a short surplice over a light tweed suit, had evidently just completed the wedding service, for he pocketed his prayer-book as we appeared, and slapped the sinister bridegroom upon the back in jovial congratulation.
Do look at Humphrey: one might fancy him an ugly archangel towering above them in his white surplice.
I dreamed that I was standing inside the communion rails of a church--I on one side of the altar-table, and the clergyman, with his surplice and his prayer-book, on the other.
said he, with a grim frown, and laying no reverent hand upon the surplice.
But I heard Maister Weston--Maister Weston was there, Miss--this was his first Sunday at Horton, you know, an' he was i' th' vestry in his surplice, helping th' Rector on with his gown--'