surrogate

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Related to surrogates: surrogate mother

sur·ro·gate

 (sûr′ə-gĭt, -gāt′, sŭr′-)
n.
1. One that takes the place of another; a substitute.
2.
a. A person or animal that functions as a substitute for another, as in a social or family role.
b. A surrogate mother.
3. In Freudian psychology, a figure of authority who takes the place of the father or mother in a person's unconscious or emotional life.
4. Law A judge in New York and some other states having jurisdiction over the probate of wills and the settlement of estates.
adj.
Substitute.
tr.v. (-gāt′) sur·ro·gat·ed, sur·ro·gat·ing, sur·ro·gates
1. To put in the place of another, especially as a successor; replace.
2. To appoint (another) as a replacement for oneself.

[Middle English, from Latin surrogātus, past participle of surrogāre, to substitute, variant of subrogāre; see subrogate.]

surrogate

n
1. a person or thing acting as a substitute
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) chiefly Brit a deputy, such as a clergyman appointed to deputize for a bishop in granting marriage licences
3. (Psychiatry) psychiatry a person who is a substitute for someone else, esp in childhood when different persons, such as a brother or teacher, can act as substitutes for the parents
4. (Law) (in some US states) a judge with jurisdiction over the probate of wills, etc
5. (modifier) of, relating to, or acting as a surrogate: a surrogate pleasure.
vb (tr)
6. to put in another's position as a deputy, substitute, etc
7. to appoint as a successor to oneself
[C17: from Latin surrogāre to substitute; see subrogate]
ˈsurrogateship n
ˌsurroˈgation n

sur•ro•gate

(n., adj. ˈsɜr əˌgeɪt, -gɪt, ˈsʌr-; v. -ˌgeɪt)

n., adj., v. -gat•ed, -gat•ing. n.
1. a person appointed to act for another; deputy.
2. a substitute.
3. (in some states) a judicial officer having jurisdiction over the probate of wills, the administration of estates, etc.
adj.
5. pertaining to, acting as, or involving a surrogate.
v.t.
6. to put into the place of another as a successor, substitute, or deputy; substitute.
[1525–35; < Latin surrogātus, assimilated variant of subrogātus; see subrogate]
sur′ro•gate•ship`, n.
sur`ro•ga′tion, n.

surrogate


Past participle: surrogated
Gerund: surrogating

Imperative
surrogate
surrogate
Present
I surrogate
you surrogate
he/she/it surrogates
we surrogate
you surrogate
they surrogate
Preterite
I surrogated
you surrogated
he/she/it surrogated
we surrogated
you surrogated
they surrogated
Present Continuous
I am surrogating
you are surrogating
he/she/it is surrogating
we are surrogating
you are surrogating
they are surrogating
Present Perfect
I have surrogated
you have surrogated
he/she/it has surrogated
we have surrogated
you have surrogated
they have surrogated
Past Continuous
I was surrogating
you were surrogating
he/she/it was surrogating
we were surrogating
you were surrogating
they were surrogating
Past Perfect
I had surrogated
you had surrogated
he/she/it had surrogated
we had surrogated
you had surrogated
they had surrogated
Future
I will surrogate
you will surrogate
he/she/it will surrogate
we will surrogate
you will surrogate
they will surrogate
Future Perfect
I will have surrogated
you will have surrogated
he/she/it will have surrogated
we will have surrogated
you will have surrogated
they will have surrogated
Future Continuous
I will be surrogating
you will be surrogating
he/she/it will be surrogating
we will be surrogating
you will be surrogating
they will be surrogating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been surrogating
you have been surrogating
he/she/it has been surrogating
we have been surrogating
you have been surrogating
they have been surrogating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been surrogating
you will have been surrogating
he/she/it will have been surrogating
we will have been surrogating
you will have been surrogating
they will have been surrogating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been surrogating
you had been surrogating
he/she/it had been surrogating
we had been surrogating
you had been surrogating
they had been surrogating
Conditional
I would surrogate
you would surrogate
he/she/it would surrogate
we would surrogate
you would surrogate
they would surrogate
Past Conditional
I would have surrogated
you would have surrogated
he/she/it would have surrogated
we would have surrogated
you would have surrogated
they would have surrogated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.surrogate - someone who takes the place of another personsurrogate - someone who takes the place of another person
backup man, fill-in, reliever, stand-in, backup, substitute, relief - someone who takes the place of another (as when things get dangerous or difficult); "the star had a stand-in for dangerous scenes"; "we need extra employees for summer fill-ins"
2.surrogate - a person appointed to represent or act on behalf of others
agent - a representative who acts on behalf of other persons or organizations
vicegerent - someone appointed by a ruler as an administrative deputy
Adj.1.surrogate - providing or receiving nurture or parental care though not related by blood or legal ties; "foster parent"; "foster child"; "foster home"; "surrogate father"
adoptive - of parents and children; related by adoption; "adoptive parents"

surrogate

noun substitute, deputy, representative, stand-in, proxy Leningrad was the third alien city to offer him a surrogate home.

surrogate

noun
One that takes the place of another:
Informal: fill-in, pinch hitter, sub.
verb
To substitute for or fill the place of:
Translations
وَكيل، بَديل، مَندوب
náhrada
erstatningsurrogat
pótlék
motina donorė
aizstājējsaizvietotājs

surrogate

[ˈsʌrəgeɪt]
A. Nsustituto m; (= substance, material) → sucedáneo m (Brit) (Rel) → vicario m
B. ADJ [substance, material] → sucedáneo
the army became his surrogate familyel ejército se convirtió en su segunda familia
C. CPD surrogate mother Nmadre f de alquiler
surrogate motherhood Nalquiler m de úteros

surrogate

[ˈsʌrəgət]
adj (= replacement) [parent, father, family] → de substitution
Uncle Paul has become a surrogate father to me → L'Oncle Paul est devenu un père de substitution pour moi.
n
(British) (= substitute) → substitut m
(also surrogate mother) (giving birth for another couple)mère f porteusesurrogate mother n (giving birth for another couple)mère f porteuse

surrogate

n (= substitute)Ersatz m, → Surrogat nt (geh) (Brit, Eccl) → ˜ Weihbischof m
attrErsatz-; surrogate bishop˜ Weihbischof m

surrogate

:
surrogate family
nErsatzfamilie f
surrogate mother
nLeihmutter f
surrogate motherhood
nLeihmutterschaft f

surrogate

[ˈsʌrəgɪt]
1. n (Brit) (substitute) → surrogato
2. adjsurrogato/a

surrogate

(ˈsarəgeit) noun
a person or thing that is considered or used as a substitute for another person or thing.
surrogate ˈmother noun
a woman who has a baby for another woman who is unable to have babies.

sur·ro·gate

a. subrogado-a, que sustituye algo o a alguien;
v. subrogar, sustituir.

surrogate

V. mother.
References in classic literature ?
The governor, who is the executive magistrate, is appointed by the legislature; is chancellor and ordinary, or surrogate of the State; is a member of the Supreme Court of Appeals, and president, with a casting vote, of one of the legislative branches.
The next day there was another visit to Doctors' Commons, and a great to-do with an attesting hostler, who, being inebriated, declined swearing anything but profane oaths, to the great scandal of a proctor and surrogate.
The surrogates typically have some background in working with special education students.
Celebrities hire surrogates through well-known and trusted surrogacy agencies.
Becky is now 30 weeks pregnant with her seventh baby and has given birth to five surrogates, as well as a son of her own.
Effective October 1, 2015, the Florida Legislature adopted sweeping revisions to the Florida Health Care Surrogates Act.
The dawdling trend has become noticeable in the past two to three years following restrictions from authorities and legal battles over cross- country IVF babies through surrogates.
The unselfish generosity of surrogates who, under UK law, can only be paid expenses, has created many families that could otherwise never have existed.
BABYSITTERS SURROGACY UK trustee Natalie Smith, 34, herself a mum to twin girls born to a surrogate, says: "Surrogates they never see them as their children, they're merely babysitting them.
Surrogate compensation of $36,600 incorporates compensation (typically an additional $3,000-$11,000 for experienced surrogates and California surrogates (219)), IVF transfer fee, maternity clothes, itemized costs, expenses during screening and matching process, delivery expenses, criminal background check, travel and hotel expenses, and housekeeping services.
New surrogates can receive a $1,250 surrogate signing bonus, and those who refer a surrogate have the opportunity to collect a $1,000 Visa/MasterCard Gift Card.
Ten months after Pande's first visit, an episode of Oprah Winfrey's television show oversimplistically portrayed would-be parents from the US as "brave missionaries" and surrogates from India as lucky lottery winners.