surrounding


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sur·round

 (sə-round′)
tr.v. sur·round·ed, sur·round·ing, sur·rounds
1. To extend on all sides of simultaneously; encircle: the magnetic field that surrounds the earth.
2. To enclose or confine on all sides so as to bar escape or outside communication: The police surrounded the house.
n.
1. Something, such as fencing or a border, that surrounds: a fireplace surround.
2.
a. The area around a thing or place: inflammation extending to the surround of the eye.
b. often surrounds Surroundings; environment: "It was the country, the flat agricultural surround, that so ravished me" (Listener).
3. A method of hunting wild animals by surrounding them and driving them to a place from which they cannot escape.

[Middle English surrounden, to inundate, from Old French suronder, from Late Latin superundāre : Latin super-, super- + Latin undāre, to rise in waves (from unda, wave; see wed- in Indo-European roots).]

sur•round•ing

(səˈraʊn dɪŋ)

n.
1. something that surrounds.
2. surroundings, environing things, circumstances, conditions, etc.; environment.
adj.
3. enclosing or encircling.
4. being the environment or adjacent area.
[1400–50; late Middle English: inundation]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.surrounding - closely encircling; "encompassing mountain ranges"; "the surrounding countryside"
close - at or within a short distance in space or time or having elements near each other; "close to noon"; "how close are we to town?"; "a close formation of ships"

surrounding

adjective
1. nearby, neighbouring, adjacent, local, bordering, adjoining, abutting Aerial bombing of the surrounding area is continuing.
plural noun
1. environment, setting, background, location, neighbourhood, milieu, environs a peaceful holiday home in beautiful surroundings
Translations
مُحيط
okolní
environnantà l’entouralentour
körülvevõ
nærliggjandi
okolitý
civaretraftaki

surrounding

[səˈraʊndɪŋ] ADJ [countryside] → circundante; [hills] → circundante, de alrededor
they disappeared into the surrounding darknessdesaparecieron en la oscuridad (que los envolvía)

surrounding

[səˈraʊndɪŋ] adjenvironnant(e)

surrounding

adjumliegend; in the surrounding countrysidein der Umgebung or Umgegend; in the surrounding darknessin der Dunkelheit, die mich/ihn etc umgab; surrounding tissue (Med) → Bindegewebe nt

surrounding

[səˈraʊndɪŋ] adjcircostante
the surrounding hills → le colline circostanti

surround

(səˈraund) verb
1. to be, or come, all round. Britain is surrounded by sea; Enemy troops surrounded the town; Mystery surrounds his death.
2. to enclose. He surrounded the castle with a high wall.
surˈrounding adjective
lying or being all round. the city and its surrounding suburbs.
surˈroundings noun plural
1. the area etc that is round a place. a pleasant hotel in delightful surroundings.
2. the conditions etc in which a person, animal etc lives. He was happy to be at home again in his usual surroundings.

surrounding

adj (area, tissue, etc.) circundante
References in classic literature ?
They came to the garden surrounding the old Richmond place and going through a gap in the hedge sat on a wooden bench beneath a bush.
The grass had been nibbled short and even, so this stretch was not shaggy and red like the surrounding country, but grey and velvety.
Then recollecting the importance of securing the fugitive, he dashed aside the surrounding bushes, and pressed eagerly forward to lend his aid in the chase.
A stillness, more oppressive and intolerable than the previous commotion, began to pervade the house and the surrounding woods.
A wild hut of underbrush, tossed together by wayfarers through the primitive forest, would acquire the home aspect by one night's lodging of such a woman, and would retain it long after her quiet figure had disappeared into the surrounding shade.
Knowing well her part, she ascended a flight of wooden steps, and was thus displayed to the surrounding multitude, at about the height of a man's shoulders above the street.
How he would figure among them in the churchyard, between services on Sundays; gathering grapes for them from the wild vines that overran the surrounding trees; reciting for their amusement all the epitaphs on the tombstones; or sauntering, with a whole bevy of them, along the banks of the adjacent mill-pond; while the more bashful country bumpkins hung sheepishly back, envying his superior elegance and address.
When the sea is moderately calm, and slightly marked with spherical ripples, and this gnomon-like fin stands up and casts shadows upon the wrinkled surface, it may well be supposed that the watery circle surrounding it somewhat resembles a dial, with its style and wavy hour-lines graved on it.
Owing to the density of the crowd of reposing whales, more immediately surrounding the embayed axis of the herd, no possible chance of escape was at present afforded us.
Just at this time the mayor was boasting that he had put an end to gambling and prize fighting in the city; but here a swarm of professional gamblers had leagued themselves with the police to fleece the strikebreakers; and any night, in the big open space in front of Brown's, one might see brawny Negroes stripped to the waist and pounding each other for money, while a howling throng of three or four thousand surged about, men and women, young white girls from the country rubbing elbows with big buck Negroes with daggers in their boots, while rows of woolly heads peered down from every window of the surrounding factories.
For a hundred or more miles above New Orleans, the river is higher than the surrounding country, and rolls its tremendous volume between massive levees twenty feet in height.
He would be a poet who could impress the winds and streams into his service, to speak for him; who nailed words to their primitive senses, as farmers drive down stakes in the spring, which the frost has heaved; who derived his words as often as he used them--transplanted them to his page with earth adhering to their roots; whose words were so true and fresh and natural that they would appear to expand like the buds at the approach of spring, though they lay half smothered between two musty leaves in a library--aye, to bloom and bear fruit there, after their kind, annually, for the faithful reader, in sympathy with surrounding Nature.