surtitle


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sur·ti·tle

 (sûr′tīt′l)

surtitle

(ˈsɜːˌtaɪtəl)
n
(Classical Music) (usually plural) a brief translation of the text of an opera or play that is being sung or spoken in a foreign language, projected above the stage
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.surtitle - translation of the words of a foreign opera (or choral work) projected on a screen above the stage
interlingual rendition, translation, version, rendering - a written communication in a second language having the same meaning as the written communication in a first language
opera - a drama set to music; consists of singing with orchestral accompaniment and an orchestral overture and interludes
Translations

surtitle

[ˈsɜːtaɪtl] Nsobretítulo m

surtitle

n (in opera etc) → Übertitel m
References in periodicals archive ?
In a brilliant piece of staging, the Welshspeaking locals' dark thoughts about the English are translated on a surtitle screen, while incomers wrestle with the language.
When Mansouri introduced the surtitle in January 1983, it was controversial.
Later, with the move to the Tivoli, a surtitle system was installed.
You can't miss even one surtitle as everyone would notice.
I am not sure why we had the English translation on both the surtitle screens and no Welsh translation.
He looked and acted like a living statue although, after a memory lapse near the start (which probably caused the ensuing surtitle breakdown), his singing did improve as things progressed.
Credit goes to OY for fixing the perennial surtitle problem, although the solution was only stopgap.
Greek performances are presented with English surtitles and foreign performances with Greek and English surtitles.
While he was a full professor and distinguished artist-in-residence at the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music he performed various roles, including stage direction, production design and surtitles, projection design, adaptation, and English singing translation.
The projected surtitles were too dim and the font too small to be read comfortably.
Both operas are sung in Italian with English surtitles.
They weaved their way around the chairs, used the wings, interacted with the players and were so effective in communicating through song and gesture the surtitles were hardly required.