surtitle


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sur·ti·tle

 (sûr′tīt′l)

surtitle

(ˈsɜːˌtaɪtəl)
n
(Classical Music) (usually plural) a brief translation of the text of an opera or play that is being sung or spoken in a foreign language, projected above the stage
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.surtitle - translation of the words of a foreign opera (or choral work) projected on a screen above the stage
interlingual rendition, translation, version, rendering - a written communication in a second language having the same meaning as the written communication in a first language
opera - a drama set to music; consists of singing with orchestral accompaniment and an orchestral overture and interludes
Translations

surtitle

[ˈsɜːtaɪtl] Nsobretítulo m

surtitle

n (in opera etc) → Übertitel m
References in periodicals archive ?
When Mansouri introduced the surtitle in January 1983, it was controversial.
You can't miss even one surtitle as everyone would notice.
I am not sure why we had the English translation on both the surtitle screens and no Welsh translation.
He looked and acted like a living statue although, after a memory lapse near the start (which probably caused the ensuing surtitle breakdown), his singing did improve as things progressed.
Credit goes to OY for fixing the perennial surtitle problem, although the solution was only stopgap.
Certainly there were occasional flaws in Thursday's opening performance, and a dimness of surtitle which made it almost impossible to pick out the fingerslips in the excellent but unattributed English translation.
None of us wants the comedy inherent in a particular phrase, verbal or musical, to be anticipated, and thus ruined, by a premature surtitle.
The production will be sung in Italian with surtitles.
Sung in Italian, with English and Welsh surtitles Today, 4pm, Wales Millennium Centre.
ROH Opera Live: La Boheme at Ucheldre, Holyhead La Boheme is sung in Italian with English surtitles.
The story follows the struggle and heartache between Nubian princess, Aida, and the Egyptian warrior Radames, told in Italian with English surtitles.
One screen of surtitles was obscured by the staging, so you had to choose whether to watch the performers, listen and read or be forever twisting back and forth.