sustenance


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sus·te·nance

 (sŭs′tə-nəns)
n.
1. The supporting of life or health; maintenance or means of livelihood: The factory provides sustenance for half the town.
2. Something, especially food, that sustains life or health: looking for sustenance in the kitchen.
3. Something that sustains something else; essential support: researchers seeking financial sustenance.

[Middle English, from Old French, from sustenir, to sustain; see sustain.]

sustenance

(ˈsʌstənəns)
n
1. means of sustaining health or life; nourishment
2. means of maintenance; livelihood
3. Also: sustention the act or process of sustaining or the quality of being sustained
[C13: from Old French sostenance, from sustenir to sustain]

sus•te•nance

(ˈsʌs tə nəns)

n.
1. means of sustaining life; nourishment.
2. means of livelihood.
3. the process of sustaining.
4. the state of being sustained.
[1250–1300; < Anglo-French; Old French sostenance. See sustain, -ance]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sustenance - a source of materials to nourish the bodysustenance - a source of materials to nourish the body
food, nutrient - any substance that can be metabolized by an animal to give energy and build tissue
milk - produced by mammary glands of female mammals for feeding their young
course - part of a meal served at one time; "she prepared a three course meal"
dainty, goody, kickshaw, treat, delicacy - something considered choice to eat
dish - a particular item of prepared food; "she prepared a special dish for dinner"
fast food - inexpensive food (hamburgers or chicken or milkshakes) prepared and served quickly
finger food - food to be eaten with the fingers
ingesta - solid and liquid nourishment taken into the body through the mouth
kosher - food that fulfills the requirements of Jewish dietary law
meal, repast - the food served and eaten at one time
mess - soft semiliquid food; "a mess of porridge"
mince - food chopped into small bits; "a mince of mushrooms"
puree - food prepared by cooking and straining or processed in a blender
stodge - heavy and filling (and usually starchy) food
wheat germ - embryo of the wheat kernel; removed before milling and eaten as a source of vitamins
vitamin - any of a group of organic substances essential in small quantities to normal metabolism
2.sustenance - the financial means whereby one livessustenance - the financial means whereby one lives; "each child was expected to pay for their keep"; "he applied to the state for support"; "he could no longer earn his own livelihood"
resource - available source of wealth; a new or reserve supply that can be drawn upon when needed
amenities, comforts, conveniences, creature comforts - things that make you comfortable and at ease; "all the comforts of home"
maintenance - means of maintenance of a family or group
meal ticket - a source of income or livelihood
subsistence - minimal (or marginal) resources for subsisting; "social security provided only a bare subsistence"
3.sustenance - the act of sustaining life by food or providing a means of subsistencesustenance - the act of sustaining life by food or providing a means of subsistence; "they were in want of sustenance"; "fishing was their main sustainment"
support - the activity of providing for or maintaining by supplying with money or necessities; "his support kept the family together"; "they gave him emotional support during difficult times"

sustenance

noun
1. nourishment, food, provisions, rations, refreshments, kai (N.Z. informal), daily bread, victuals, edibles, comestibles, provender, aliment, eatables, refection The state provided a basic quantity of food for daily sustenance.
2. support, maintenance, livelihood, subsistence everything that is necessary for the sustenance of the offspring

sustenance

noun
2. That which sustains the mind or spirit:
Translations

sustenance

[ˈsʌstɪnəns] Nsustento m
they depend for their sustenance on; they get their sustenance fromse sustentan or alimentan de

sustenance

[ˈsʌstɪnəns] n (= nourishment) → nourriture f

sustenance

n (= food and drink)Nahrung f; (= nutritive quality)Nährwert m; to get one’s sustenance from somethingsich von etw ernähren

sustenance

[ˈsʌstɪnəns] n (food) → nutrimento; (livelihood) → mezzi mpl di sussistenza or di sostentamento
there's not much sustenance in it → non è molto nutriente

sus·te·nance

n. sustentación, sustento.
References in classic literature ?
Without any aid from the science of cookery, he was immediately employed, in common with his fellows, in gorging himself with this digestible sustenance.
Without this signet in his flesh, he could have attributed no more substance to them than to the empty confusion of imaginary scenes with which he had fed his spirit, until even that poor sustenance was exhausted.
To say the truth, there was much need of professional assistance, not merely for Hester herself, but still more urgently for the child -- who, drawing its sustenance from the maternal bosom, seemed to have drank in with it all the turmoil, the anguish and despair, which pervaded the mother's system.
For a long time, now, the circus-running sun has raced within his fiery ring, and needs no sustenance but what's in himself.
Her young husband was as happy as she; for he was doing his whole duty, he worked early and late at his handicraft, his bread was honest bread well and fairly earned, he was prospering, he was furnishing shelter and sustenance to his family, he was adding his mite to the wealth of the nation.
They clung to the purple moors behind and around their dwelling--to the hollow vale into which the pebbly bridle-path leading from their gate descended, and which wound between fern- banks first, and then amongst a few of the wildest little pasture- fields that ever bordered a wilderness of heath, or gave sustenance to a flock of grey moorland sheep, with their little mossy-faced lambs:- they clung to this scene, I say, with a perfect enthusiasm of attachment.
He had an aversion to yielding so completely to his feelings, choosing rather to absent himself; and eating once in twenty-four hours seemed sufficient sustenance for him.
The twins no longer derive their sustenance from Nature's founts - in short,' said Mr.
A day's work is a day's work, neither more nor less, and the man who does it needs a day's sustenance, a night's repose, and due leisure, whether he be painter or ploughman.
It is to be remembered likewise that neither the Greeks nor Romans, from whom we have received all our information, ever carried their arms into this part of the world, or ever heard of multitudes of nations that dwell upon the banks of this vast river; that the countries where the Nile rises, and those through which it runs, have no inhabitants but what are savage and uncivilised; that before they could arrive at its head, they must surmount the insuperable obstacles of impassable forests, inaccessible cliffs, and deserts crowded with beasts of prey, fierce by nature, and raging for want of sustenance.
The women and children of a man's retinue may be likened to a military unit for which he is responsible in various ways, as in matters of instruction, discipline, sustenance, and the exigencies of their continual roamings and their unending strife with other communities and with the red Martians.
Day after day he labored hard without wasting a moment, except at meal times, when Tabitha summoned him to the pork and cabbage, or such other sustenance as she had picked up, or Providence had sent them.