swabber

swab·ber

 (swŏb′ər)
n.
1. One who uses a swab.
2. A swab or mop.
3. Slang A sailor.

swabber

(ˈswɒbə)
n
1. a person who uses a swab
2. a device designed for swabbing
3. slang an uncouth fellow

swab•ber

(ˈswɒb ər)

n.
1. a person who uses a swab.
2. Slang. swab (def. 6).
3. a swab; mop.
[1585–95; < Dutch zwabber; compare Middle Low German swabben to splash in water or filth]
References in periodicals archive ?
The sampling site and the names of people who came in contact with this bird, the swabber, and the handler, are added to the recording sheet.
Cuckolds like Johan and other foolish old men seem frequently to have had their faces blackened in token of their folly; this is the case with the foolishly arrogant, gulled cheat Grim the Collier of Croyden in Richard Edwards's boy company play Damon and Pithias (printed 1571 and performed by the Children of the Chapel), the laughable old would-be cuckolder Lorenzo in boy company author George Chapman's May Day (1601; printed 1611), and the foolish cuckold and cowardly braggart John Swabber in Acteon and Diana (printed ca.
Presenters Matt Allwright and Chris Hollins send a team of secret swabbers to see exactly how clean our favourite supermarkets are and discover all sorts of bacteria lurking on shelves, trolley handles and vegetable trays.
Strips of bark, or swabbers, also spoon honey out of opened hives.