swag


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swag

 (swăg)
n.
1.
a. An ornamental drapery or curtain draped in a curve between two points.
b. An ornamental festoon of flowers or fruit.
c. A carving or plaster molding of such an ornament.
2. Promotional items, especially when given for free, considered as a group.
3. Slang Stolen property; loot.
4. Australian The pack or bundle containing the personal belongings of a swagman.
5. Slang See schwag.
intr.v. swagged, swag·ging, swags
1. Chiefly British To lurch or sway.
2. Australian To travel about with a pack or swag.

[Probably of Scandinavian origin.]

swag

(swæɡ)
n
1. slang property obtained by theft or other illicit means
2. slang goods; valuables
3. (Art Terms) an ornamental festoon of fruit, flowers, or drapery or a representation of this
4. a swaying movement; lurch
5. (Physical Geography) dialect Midland English a depression filled with water, resulting from mining subsidence
6. (Clothing & Fashion) informal Austral and NZ (formerly) a swagman's pack containing personal belongings
7. go on the swag informal Austral and NZ to become a tramp
8. swags of informal Austral and NZ lots of
vb, swags, swagging or swagged
9. chiefly Brit to lurch or sag or cause to lurch or sag
10. (Art Terms) (tr) to adorn or arrange with swags
11. (intr) informal Austral to tramp about carrying a pack of personal belongings
[C17: perhaps of Scandinavian origin; compare Norwegian svagga to sway]

swag1

(swæg)

n., v. swagged, swag•ging. n.
1. a suspended garland, drapery, etc., fastened at each end and hanging down in the middle; festoon.
2. a wreath or cluster of foliage, flowers, or fruit.
3. a swale.
4. a swaying or lurching movement.
v.i.
5. to sway or lurch.
6. to hang loosely and heavily; sag.
v.t.
7. to cause to sway or sag.
8. to adorn with swags.
[1520–30; perhaps < Scandinavian; compare Norwegian svaga, svagga to sway, rock]

swag2

(swæg)

n., v. swagged, swag•ging. n.
1. Slang.
a. plunder; booty.
b. money; valuables.
2. Australian. a traveler's bundle containing food and belongings.
v.i.
3. Australian. to travel about carrying one's bundle of belongings.
[1805–15; perhaps identical with swag1]

Swag

 quantity of money or goods, usually stolen; a bundle of personal belongings carried by a tramp, miner, or traveller in the bush, 1864; a decorative festoon of flowers, 1794; of fruit and flowers, 1813.

swag


Past participle: swagged
Gerund: swagging

Imperative
swag
swag
Present
I swag
you swag
he/she/it swags
we swag
you swag
they swag
Preterite
I swagged
you swagged
he/she/it swagged
we swagged
you swagged
they swagged
Present Continuous
I am swagging
you are swagging
he/she/it is swagging
we are swagging
you are swagging
they are swagging
Present Perfect
I have swagged
you have swagged
he/she/it has swagged
we have swagged
you have swagged
they have swagged
Past Continuous
I was swagging
you were swagging
he/she/it was swagging
we were swagging
you were swagging
they were swagging
Past Perfect
I had swagged
you had swagged
he/she/it had swagged
we had swagged
you had swagged
they had swagged
Future
I will swag
you will swag
he/she/it will swag
we will swag
you will swag
they will swag
Future Perfect
I will have swagged
you will have swagged
he/she/it will have swagged
we will have swagged
you will have swagged
they will have swagged
Future Continuous
I will be swagging
you will be swagging
he/she/it will be swagging
we will be swagging
you will be swagging
they will be swagging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been swagging
you have been swagging
he/she/it has been swagging
we have been swagging
you have been swagging
they have been swagging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been swagging
you will have been swagging
he/she/it will have been swagging
we will have been swagging
you will have been swagging
they will have been swagging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been swagging
you had been swagging
he/she/it had been swagging
we had been swagging
you had been swagging
they had been swagging
Conditional
I would swag
you would swag
he/she/it would swag
we would swag
you would swag
they would swag
Past Conditional
I would have swagged
you would have swagged
he/she/it would have swagged
we would have swagged
you would have swagged
they would have swagged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.swag - valuable goods
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
valuable - something of value; "all our valuables were stolen"
2.swag - goods or money obtained illegallyswag - goods or money obtained illegally  
stolen property - property that has been stolen
cut - a share of the profits; "everyone got a cut of the earnings"
3.swag - a bundle containing the personal belongings of a swagman
sheaf, bundle - a package of several things tied together for carrying or storing
Australia, Commonwealth of Australia - a nation occupying the whole of the Australian continent; Aboriginal tribes are thought to have migrated from southeastern Asia 20,000 years ago; first Europeans were British convicts sent there as a penal colony
Verb1.swag - droop, sink, or settle from or as if from pressure or loss of tautness
drop down, sink, drop - fall or descend to a lower place or level; "He sank to his knees"
slouch, slump - assume a drooping posture or carriage
bag - hang loosely, like an empty bag
2.swag - walk as if unable to control one's movements; "The drunken man staggered into the room"
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"
3.swag - sway heavily or unsteadily
rock, sway, shake - move back and forth or sideways; "the ship was rocking"; "the tall building swayed"; "She rocked back and forth on her feet"
Translations
بَضائِع مَسْروقَه، غَنائِمصُرَّة أمْتِعَة
kořistranec
bylttyvekoster
batyulopott holmi
òÿfipinkill
mantanešulysvogti daiktai
laupījumsnastiņapaunazagta manta
çalıntı malçıkınyağma

swag

[swæg] Nbotín m

swag

n (inf)Beute f

swag

[swæg] n (fam) → malloppo

swag

(swӕg) noun
1. stolen goods.
2. in Australia, a tramp's bundle.
References in classic literature ?
Whoever could ravish a column from a pagan temple, did it and contributed his swag to this Christian one.
The swag I gathered won't half square me up, and the first thing we know, my creditors-- well, you know what'll happen.
What'll we do with what little swag we've got left?
Bud Dixon would wake up and miss the swag, and would come straight for us, for he ain't afeard of anything or anybody, that man ain't.
If we got the swag, we'd GOT to do for him, or he would hunt us down and do for us, sure.
Whether against the express will of Providence, it is twisted upon the crown of the head and there coiled away like a rope on a ship's deck; whether it be stuck behind the ears and hangs down like the swag of a small window-curtain; or whether it be permitted to flow over the shoulders in natural ringlets, it is always the pride of the owner, and the glory of the toilette.
Three of our boys were killed, however, before we got the swag.
I tell you what," said I: "I'll come just to show you the ropes, and I won't take a pennyweight of the swag.
Then say to the two men who wish to kill me that if they do so they will never live to spend their share of the swag, for only I can get you safely to any port.
Most probably, out of his share of the swag, Nathaniel Letton would erect a couple of new buildings for that university of his.
he whispered then, "but you take half the swag, old boy, and right well you've earned it.
It's all arranged about bringing off the swag, is it?