swam


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swam

 (swăm)
v.
Past tense of swim.

swam

(swæm)
vb
the past tense of swim

swim

(swɪm)

v. swam, swum, swim•ming,
n. v.i.
1. to move in water by using the limbs, fins, tail, etc.
2. to float on the surface of water or some other liquid.
3. to move, rest, or be suspended in air as if swimming in water.
4. to move, glide, or go smoothly over a surface.
5. to be immersed or flooded with a liquid: eyes swimming with tears.
6. to be dizzy or giddy; seem to whirl: My head began to swim.
v.t.
7. to move along in or cross (a body of water) by swimming.
8. to perform (a particular stroke) in swimming.
9. to cause to swim or float.
n.
10. an act, instance, or period of swimming.
11. a motion as of swimming.
Idioms:
in the swim, alert to or actively engaged in current affairs, social activities, etc.
[before 900; Middle English swimmen, Old English swimman, c. Old Saxon, Old High German swimman, Old Norse svimma]
swim′mer, n.
Translations

swim

(swim) present participle ˈswimming: past tense swam (swӕm) : past participle swum (swam) verb
1. to move through water using arms and legs or fins, tails etc. The children aren't allowed to go sailing until they've learnt to swim; I'm going / I've been swimming; She swam to the shore; They watched the fish swimming about in the aquarium.
2. to cross (a river etc), compete in (a race), cover (a distance etc) by swimming. He swam three lengths of the swimming-pool; She can't swim a stroke (= at all).
3. to seem to be moving round and round, as a result of dizziness etc. His head was swimming; Everything began to swim before his eyes.
noun
an act of swimming. We went for a swim in the lake.
ˈswimmer noun
a person who swims or who can swim. He's a strong swimmer.
ˈswimming adjective
covered with, or floating in, a liquid. meat swimming in/with grease.
ˈswimming-bath, ˈswimming-pool nouns
an indoor or outdoor pool for swimming in.
ˈswimming-trunks noun plural
short pants worn by boys and men for swimming.
ˈswimsuit, ˈswimming-costume nouns
a (woman's) garment worn for swimming.

swam

pret de swim
References in classic literature ?
I swam as long as I could, but I soon got all exhausted and thought I was going to sink.
D'Artagnan swam to it and held it, suspending himself by this rope, his head alone out of water.
Kotick thought that that was good advice, so he swam round to his own beach, hauled out, and slept for half an hour, twitching all over, as seals will.
When he swam on his back, you felt that that was the only possible method of progression.
I swam more vigorously; but, cramped by my clothes, which stuck to me like a leaden weight, I felt great difficulty in bearing up.
said Alice, as she swam about, trying to find her way out.
A peculiar, tingling thrill ran through my veins, and my head swam.
He swam quartering up- stream, but still was swept downward rather faster than he had expected.
Then, remembering how his father had often told him that a kind deed is never lost, he swam to Alidoro and, catching hold of his tail, dragged him to the shore.
This was an easy feat to him, for he usually attracted a crowd of spectators in the bay before the lighthouse at Marseilles when he swam there, and was unanimously declared to be the best swimmer in the port.
In spite of all this, however, he did not lose sight of his raft, but swam as fast as he could towards it, got hold of it, and climbed on board again so as to escape drowning.
And he swam, not to save his life, not with the fear of death upon him.