swayback


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Related to swayback: swayback posture

sway·back

 (swā′băk′)
n.
Excessive inward or downward curvature of the spine, especially in a horse.

sway′backed′ adj.

sway•back

(ˈsweɪˌbæk)
n.
an excessive downward curvature of the spinal column in the dorsal region, esp. of horses.
[1865–70, Amer.]
sway′backed`, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.swayback - having abnormal sagging of the spine (especially in horses)
unfit - not in good physical or mental condition; out of condition; "fat and very unfit"; "certified as unfit for army service"; "drunk and unfit for service"
Translations
notkoselkä
References in periodicals archive ?
Swayback posture is a simple postural fault to identify using gross landmarks of the lateral malleolus, greater trochanter of the femur, and the greater tubercle of the humerus.
The most common postural issues are a result of constant slouching and swayback.
I mean, how many times have you scouted long and hard to find the perfect tree that will allow you to get the drop on an old swayback, only to hang your stand without considering the buck's likely approach?
More important in Figure 1, though, note the mild treble tilt or swayback, and the consequent relative prominence of the two octaves below 2 kHz; these probably correlate with my perception of a pleasant top and crisp upper midrange.
The up and down motion causes a condition known as swayback, says the Journal of the American Medical Association.
The day I took Barb to look at it it had not been blocked up yet and it had quite a swayback.
Detritus in the roadway: litter, broken bottles, scraps of paper in the gutter, a Styrofoam cup blows across the street; or these meager houses with chipped paint, cracked glass, a patchwork of missing shingles across their swayback roofs.
The paunchy, swayback, middle-aged appearance of this willing chrome victim of technology helps the Egyptian take on a youthful, hopeful and eager appearance by contrast.
This can lead to swayback (lordotic) posture and to compressed vertebral discs.