sweeper


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sweep·er

 (swē′pər)
n.
1. One that sweeps.
2. A carpet sweeper.
3. Sports A lone defender who plays between the last line of defenders and the goalie in some defensive configurations in soccer.

sweeper

(ˈswiːpə)
n
1. a person employed to sweep, such as a roadsweeper
2. any device for sweeping: a carpet sweeper.
3. (Soccer) informal soccer a player who supports the main defenders, as by intercepting loose balls, etc

sweep•er

(ˈswi pər)

n.
1. a person or thing that sweeps.
3. a janitor.
[1400–50]

sweeper

A player operating behind the defensive line of four, sweeping up loose balls.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sweeper - an employee who sweeps (floors or streets etc.)sweeper - an employee who sweeps (floors or streets etc.)
employee - a worker who is hired to perform a job
2.sweeper - a cleaning implement with revolving brushes that pick up dirt as the implement is pushed over a carpetsweeper - a cleaning implement with revolving brushes that pick up dirt as the implement is pushed over a carpet
cleaning device, cleaning equipment, cleaning implement - any of a large class of implements used for cleaning
3.sweeper - little-known nocturnal fish of warm shallow seas with an oblong compressed body
teleost, teleost fish, teleostan - a bony fish of the subclass Teleostei
Translations
مِكْنِسَه
-kametařzametač
=-fejerfejer
sópari; sópur, kústur
süpüren kimse/şey

sweeper

[ˈswiːpəʳ] N
1. (= cleaner) → barrendero/a m/f; (= machine) (for streets) → barredora f (also carpet sweeper) → cepillo m mecánico
2. (Ftbl) → líbero m

sweeper

[ˈswiːpər] n
(= person) → balayeur/euse m/f
(= machine) → balayeuse f
(FOOTBALL)libéro mf

sweeper

n
(= road sweeper)Straßenkehrer(in) m(f)or -feger(in) m(f); (= machine)Kehrmaschine f; (= carpet sweeper)Teppichkehrer m
(Ftbl) → Ausputzer(in) m(f)

sweeper

[ˈswiːpəʳ] n
a. (worker) → spazzino/a
b. (machine) → spazzatrice f
c. (Brit) (Ftbl) → libero

sweep

(swiːp) past tense, past participle swept (swept) verb
1. to clean (a room etc) using a brush or broom. The room has been swept clean.
2. to move as though with a brush. She swept the crumbs off the table with her hand; The wave swept him overboard; Don't get swept away by (= become over-enthusiastic about) the idea!; She swept aside my objections.
3. to move quickly over. The disease/craze is sweeping the country.
4. to move swiftly or in a proud manner. High winds sweep across the desert; She swept into my room without knocking on the door.
noun
1. an act of sweeping, or process of being swept, with a brush etc. She gave the room a sweep.
2. a sweeping movement. He indicated the damage with a sweep of his hand.
3. a person who cleans chimneys.
4. a sweepstake.
ˈsweeper noun
a person or thing that sweeps. a road-sweeper; May I borrow your carpet-sweeper?
ˈsweeping adjective
1. that sweeps. a sweeping gesture.
2. (of changes etc) very great. a sweeping victory; sweeping reforms.
ˈsweeping-brush noun
a type of brush with a long handle that is used for sweeping floors etc.
at one/a sweep
by one action, at one time. He fired half of his employees at one sweep.
sweep (someone) off his feet
to affect (a person) with strong emotion or enthusiasm.
sweep out
to sweep (a room etc) thoroughly; to clean by sweeping. to sweep the classroom out.
sweep the board
to be very successful; to win all the prizes.
sweep under the carpet
to avoid facing, or dealing with (an unpleasant situation etc) by pretending it does not exist.
sweep up
to gather together or remove (dirt etc) by sweeping. She swept up the crumbs/mess.
References in classic literature ?
Now a bag of remarkable clothespins, next, a wonderful nutmeg grater which fell to pieces at the first trial, a knife cleaner that spoiled all the knives, or a sweeper that picked the nap neatly off the carpet and left the dirt, labor-saving soap that took the skin off one's hands, infallible cements which stuck firmly to nothing but the fingers of the deluded buyer, and every kind of tinware, from a toy savings bank for odd pennies, to a wonderful boiler which would wash articles in its own steam with every prospect of exploding in the process.
The news of Nag's death was all over the garden, for the sweeper had thrown the body on the rubbish-heap.
Flannelly lines ran through the honey-stores, the pollen-larders, the foundations, and, worst of all, through the babies in their cradles, till the Sweeper Guards spent half their time tossing out useless little corpses.
Kim hailed a sweeper, who promptly retorted with a piece of unnecessary insolence, in the natural belief that the European boy could not follow it.
The old street sweeper at my elbow told me that these were the gifts brought in from the far outlying districts by the commanding officers of the frontier posts.
If she spoiled everybody who came near her with kindness and compliments--if she begged pardon of all her servants for troubling them to answer the bell--if she apologized to a shopboy who showed her a piece of silk, or made a curtsey to a street- sweeper with a complimentary remark upon the elegant state of his crossing--and she was almost capable of every one of these follies-- the notion that an old acquaintance was miserable was sure to soften her heart; nor would she hear of anybody's being deservedly unhappy.
Among the many billets which I have filled in America during my wandering life, I was once janitor and sweeper out of the laboratory at York College.
The old devil left a note for us to say that he had rather be a free crossing sweeper in New York than a large mine owner under the power of a ring of blackmailers.
He was provided with a stiff besom, such as is used by street sweepers, and it was his place to follow down the line the man who drew out the smoking entrails from the carcass of the steer; this mass was to be swept into a trap, which was then closed, so that no one might slip into it.
Then, in the evening when the assistants left, he had to put back the sheets on the models and the cases and `gang' the sweepers again.
And as he was passing near the mizzen-mast he perceived a coil of rope left lying on the deck by the oversight of the sweepers.
The constable seemed to be on terms of scornful inti macy with Maltese, with Eurasians, with China men, with Klings, and with the sweepers attached to a temple, with whom he talked at the gate.