swept


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Related to swept: Swept volume, Swept Away, Swept wing, swept off my feet

swept

 (swĕpt)
v.
Past tense and past participle of sweep.

swept

(swɛpt)
vb
the past tense of sweep

sweep1

(swip)

v. swept, sweep•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to remove (dust, dirt, etc.) with a broom, brush, or the like.
2. to clear (a floor, room, chimney, etc.) of dirt, litter, or the like, using a broom or brush.
3. to drive or carry by some steady force, as of a wind or wave.
4. to pass or draw over a surface with a continuous stroke or movement: The painter swept a brush over his canvas.
5. to make (a path, opening, etc.) with or as if with a broom.
6. to clear (a surface, place, etc.) (often fol. by of): to sweep the sea of enemy ships.
7. (of winds, a flood, etc.) to pass over (a surface, region, etc.) with a steady, driving movement.
8. to search (an area or building) thoroughly.
9. to direct a gaze, the eyes, etc., over (a region, area, etc.).
10. to win decisively in (a contest or series of contests).
v.i.
11. to sweep a floor, room, etc., with or as if with a broom.
12. to move swiftly and forcefully (usu. fol. by along, into, etc.).
13. to move or extend in a wide curve or circuit: His glance swept around the room.
14. to conduct an underwater search by towing a drag under the surface of the water.
n.
15. the act of sweeping with or as if with a broom.
16. the steady, driving motion of something: the sweep of the wind.
17. a swinging or curving movement or stroke, as of the arm or an oar.
18. a continuous extent or stretch.
19. a leverlike device for raising or lowering a bucket in a well.
20. a large oar used in small vessels, sometimes to assist the rudder or to propel the craft.
21. an overwhelming victory in a contest.
22. a winning of all the games, prizes, etc., in a contest by one contestant.
24. any of the detachable triangular blades on a cultivator.
26.
a. (in whist) the winning of all the tricks in a hand. Compare slam 2.
b. (in casino) a pairing or combining, and hence taking, of all the cards on the board.
[1250–1300; Middle English swepen (v.); compare Old English geswēpa sweepings, derivative of swāpan to sweep, c. Old Frisian swēpa, Old Saxon swēpan, Old High German sweifan, Old Norse sveipa]

sweep2

(swip)

n.
[1845–55; by shortening]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.swept - possessing sweep; "the sleek swept wings of the plane"
unswept - not swept or having sweep; "a boxy little plane with square unswept wings"
Translations

swept

:
sweptback
adj wingpfeilförmig
swept volume
n (Tech, Aut etc) → Hubraum m
sweptwing
adj aircraftmit pfeilförmigen Flügeln

sweep

(swiːp) past tense, past participle swept (swept) verb
1. to clean (a room etc) using a brush or broom. The room has been swept clean.
2. to move as though with a brush. She swept the crumbs off the table with her hand; The wave swept him overboard; Don't get swept away by (= become over-enthusiastic about) the idea!; She swept aside my objections.
3. to move quickly over. The disease/craze is sweeping the country.
4. to move swiftly or in a proud manner. High winds sweep across the desert; She swept into my room without knocking on the door.
noun
1. an act of sweeping, or process of being swept, with a brush etc. She gave the room a sweep.
2. a sweeping movement. He indicated the damage with a sweep of his hand.
3. a person who cleans chimneys.
4. a sweepstake.
ˈsweeper noun
a person or thing that sweeps. a road-sweeper; May I borrow your carpet-sweeper?
ˈsweeping adjective
1. that sweeps. a sweeping gesture.
2. (of changes etc) very great. a sweeping victory; sweeping reforms.
ˈsweeping-brush noun
a type of brush with a long handle that is used for sweeping floors etc.
at one/a sweep
by one action, at one time. He fired half of his employees at one sweep.
sweep (someone) off his feet
to affect (a person) with strong emotion or enthusiasm.
sweep out
to sweep (a room etc) thoroughly; to clean by sweeping. to sweep the classroom out.
sweep the board
to be very successful; to win all the prizes.
sweep under the carpet
to avoid facing, or dealing with (an unpleasant situation etc) by pretending it does not exist.
sweep up
to gather together or remove (dirt etc) by sweeping. She swept up the crumbs/mess.
References in classic literature ?
The clock struck six and, having swept up the hearth, Beth put a pair of slippers down to warm.
Again he raised the hands to caress the boy and then a look of horror swept over his face.
It really was a violent storm, approaching a hurricane in force, and at one time it seemed as though the craft, having been heeled far over under a staggering wave that swept her decks, would not come back to an even keel.
The wind shook the doors and windows impatiently, then swept on again, singing through the big spaces.
The dark green of the branches stood out and glistened against the white muslin curtains which draped the windows, and which puffed, floated, and flapped at the capricious will of a stiff breeze that swept up from the Gulf.
Just as Alice veiled her eyes in horror, under the impression that they were about to be swept within the vortex at the foot of the cataract, the canoe floated, stationary, at the side of a flat rock, that lay on a level with the water.
Young Andrews sprang to his feet, and, with the force of a hose flushing a gutter, swept his soiled visitors into the hall.
The foundation of their airy castles lay already before them in the strip of rich alluvium on the river bank, where the North Fork, sharply curving round the base of Devil's Spur, had for centuries swept the detritus of gulch and canyon.
He therefore dug his cellar, and laid the deep foundations of his mansion, on the square of earth whence Matthew Maule, forty years before, had first swept away the fallen leaves.
The besom of reform hath swept him out of office, and a worthier successor wears his dignity and pockets his emoluments.
Grose had put her finger on it: everything but a sort of passion of tenderness for him was swept away by his presence.
The poor fellow whom Queequeg had handled so roughly, was swept overboard; all hands were in a panic; and to attempt snatching at the boom to stay it, seemed madness.