swindler


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Related to swindler: Gypsy, Bernie Madoff

swin·dle

 (swĭn′dl)
v. swin·dled, swin·dling, swin·dles
v.tr.
1. To cheat or defraud of money or property.
2. To obtain by fraudulent means: swindled money from the company.
v.intr.
To practice fraud as a means of obtaining money or property.
n.
The act or an instance of swindling.

[Back-formation from swindler, one who swindles, from German Schwindler, giddy person, cheat, from schwindeln, to be dizzy, swindle, from Middle High German, from Old High German swintilōn, frequentative of swintan, to disappear.]

swin′dler n.

swindler

, swindle - Swindler and swindle are from German Schwindler, "promoter of wild schemes; cheat."
See also related terms for swindle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.swindler - a person who swindles you by means of deception or fraud
card shark, card sharp, card sharper, cardsharp, cardsharper, sharper, sharpie, sharpy - a professional card player who makes a living by cheating at card games
clip artist - a swindler who fleeces the victim
con artist, con man, confidence man - a swindler who exploits the confidence of his victim
beguiler, cheater, deceiver, trickster, slicker, cheat - someone who leads you to believe something that is not true
welcher, welsher - someone who swindles you by not repaying a debt or wager

swindler

noun cheat, fraud, hustler (U.S. informal), con man (informal), sharper, shark, rogue, charlatan, rook (slang), rascal, trickster, impostor, fraudster, knave (archaic), confidence trickster, mountebank, grifter (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), chiseller (informal) Swindlers have cheated investors out of £12 million.

swindler

noun
Translations
غَشّاش، مُحْتال، مُخادِع
podvodník
svindler
svindlari
goljuf

swindler

[ˈswɪndləʳ] Nestafador(a) m/f, timador(a) m/f

swindler

[ˈswɪndlər] nescroc m

swindler

nSchwindler(in) m(f), → Gauner(in) m(f) (inf)

swindler

[ˈswɪndləʳ] nimbroglione/a, truffatore/trice

swindle

(ˈswindl) verb
to cheat. That shopkeeper has swindled me!; He swindled me out of $4.
noun
an act or example of swindling; a fraud. an insurance swindle; Our new car's a swindle – it's falling to pieces.
ˈswindler noun
a person who swindles.
References in classic literature ?
Without this agitation and without his inward delight (for vanity is a swindler which never fails of its dupe), he would certainly have reflected that, supposing it were true, a girl like Suzanne, whose heart was not yet spoiled, would have died a thousand deaths before beginning a discussion of this kind and asking for money.
Ulysses," replied Alcinous, "not one of us who sees you has any idea that you are a charlatan or a swindler.
It was that old glory that opened the series of companions of those morning rides; a series which extended through three successive Parisian spring-times and comprised a famous physiologist, a fellow who seemed to hint that mankind could be made immortal or at least everlastingly old; a fashionable philosopher and psychologist who used to lecture to enormous audiences of women with his tongue in his cheek (but never permitted himself anything of the kind when talking to Rita); that surly dandy Cabanel (but he only once, from mere vanity), and everybody else at all distinguished including also a celebrated person who turned out later to be a swindler.
Even the knowledge that he had succeeded where the police of three countries had failed, and that he had outmanoeuvred at every point the most accomplished swindler in Europe, was insufficient to rouse him from his nervous prostration.
They say of a person they admire, "Ah, he is a charming swindler, and a most exquisite liar
Perhaps, instead of being a millionaire, you yourself are a swindler and an adventurer
The apparent artlessness of this political swindler prevented her from suspecting a trick.
He is an idle ruffian,' said Ralph; 'a vagabond from beyond the sea where he travelled for his crimes; a felon let loose to run his neck into the halter; a swindler, who has the audacity to try his schemes on me who know him well.
Ballmeyer was the best specimen of the high-class "gentleman swindler.
Populace-hodgepodge: therein is everything mixed with everything, saint and swindler, gentleman and Jew, and every beast out of Noah's ark.
And it's to this man's son--this scoundrel, gambler, swindler, murderer of a Rawdon Crawley, that Matilda leaves the bulk of her money.
That was so far well, but Vronsky knew that in this dirty business, though his only share in it was undertaking by word of mouth to be surety for Venovsky, it was absolutely necessary for him to have the two thousand five hundred roubles so as to be able to fling it at the swindler, and have no more words with him.