swine


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

swine

 (swīn)
n. pl. swine
1. Any of various omnivorous, even-toed ungulates of the family Suidae, having a stout body with thick skin, a short neck, and a movable snout, especially the domesticated pig.
2. A person regarded as contemptible or disgusting.

[Middle English, from Old English swīn; see sū- in Indo-European roots.]

swine

(swaɪn)
npl swinespl swine
1. a coarse or contemptible person
2. (Animals) another name for a pig
[Old English swīn; related to Old Norse svīn, Gothic swein, Latin suīnus relating to swine]
ˈswineˌlike adj
ˈswinish adj
ˈswinishly adv
ˈswinishness n

swine

(swaɪn)

n., pl. swine.
1. any stout artiodactyl mammal of the Old World family Suidae, having a disklike snout and a thick hide usu. sparsely covered with coarse hair. Compare hog, pig, wild boar.
2. the domestic hog, Sus scrofa.
3. a coarse, gross, or brutishly sensual person.
4. a contemptible person.
[before 900; Old English swīn, c. Old High German swīn, Old Norse svīn, Gothic swein hog, Latin suīnus (adj.) porcine; akin to sow2]

swine

  • gruntle - Can be used for swine, meaning "to make a little grunt."
  • pig - Originally meant just "young pig" until the 16th century—the word in Old and Middle English for the animal was swine.
  • swine - The collective (and ancestral) term for domesticated pigs and hogs; a hog is 120 pounds and ready for market, while a pig is immature and weighs less.
  • chat - To call a swine.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.swine - stout-bodied short-legged omnivorous animalsswine - stout-bodied short-legged omnivorous animals
artiodactyl, artiodactyl mammal, even-toed ungulate - placental mammal having hooves with an even number of functional toes on each foot
family Suidae, Suidae - pigs; hogs; boars
pig, squealer, Sus scrofa, grunter, hog - domestic swine
boar - an uncastrated male hog
sow - an adult female hog
razorback, razorback hog, razorbacked hog - a mongrel hog with a thin body and long legs and a ridged back; a wild or semi-wild descendant of improved breeds; found chiefly in the southeastern United States
boar, Sus scrofa, wild boar - Old World wild swine having a narrow body and prominent tusks from which most domestic swine come; introduced in United States
babiroussa, babirusa, babirussa, Babyrousa Babyrussa - Indonesian wild pig with enormous curved canine teeth
warthog - African wild swine with warty protuberances on the face and large protruding tusks

swine

plural noun
Related words
collective nouns herd, sounder, dryft
Translations
خِنْزيرشَخْص قَذِر
prasesvině
svin
sika
svínsvín, òorpari
cūka
svin

swine

[swaɪn]
A. N
1. (Zool) (pl inv) → cerdo m, puerco m
2. (fig) (= person) → canalla mf, cochino/a m/f, marrano/a m/f
you swine!¡canalla!
what a swine he is!¡es un canalla!
B. CPD swine fever Nfiebre f porcina

swine

[ˈswaɪn] n
[swine] [ˈswaɪn] (pl) (= pig) → pourceau m, porc m
(= person) → salaud m

swine

n
pl <-> (old, form)Schwein nt ? pearl2 N
pl <-s> (pej inf: = man) → (gemeiner) Hund (inf); (= woman)gemeine Sau (sl); this translation is a swinediese Übersetzung ist wirklich gemein (inf)

swine

:
swine fever
nSchweinepest f
swineherd
n (old)Schweinehirt(in) m(f)

swine

[swaɪn] n
a. (fig) (fam!) (person) → porco (fam!)
you swine! → brutto porco!
b. (pl inv) (old) (pig) → maiale m

swine

(swain) noun
1. (plural swine) an old word for a pig.
2. (plural swines) an offensive word for a person who behaves in a cruel or disgusting way towards others.
References in classic literature ?
It was only by an effort that one could realize that it was made by animals, that it was the distant lowing of ten thousand cattle, the distant grunting of ten thousand swine.
Presently there was a distant blare of military music; it came nearer, still nearer, and soon a noble cavalcade wound into view, glorious with plumed helmets and flashing mail and flaunting banners and rich doublets and horse-cloths and gilded spear- heads; and through the muck and swine, and naked brats, and joyous dogs, and shabby huts, it took its gallant way, and in its wake we followed.
Men and women, old and young, married and single, were ranked with horses, sheep, and swine.
One evening, in the beginning of June, I had stayed out very late with Mary Ann in the wood; we had, as usual, separated ourselves from the others, and had wandered far; so far that we lost our way, and had to ask it at a lonely cottage, where a man and woman lived, who looked after a herd of half-wild swine that fed on the mast in the wood.
The herd of possessed swine could have had no worse spirits in them than those animals of yours, sir.
The gluttony of Swine is put before us, as an example to the young.
Thus communed these; while to their lowly dome, The full-fed swine return'd with evening home; Compell'd, reluctant, to the several sties, With din obstreperous, and ungrateful cries.
I could see distinctly the limbs of these vermin with my naked eye, much better than those of a European louse through a microscope, and their snouts with which they rooted like swine.
Stay, it has just occurred to me that I want someone to look after the swine, for I have so very many of them.
We were making such a noise that I noticed nothing of a tumult outside, until some one, who I think was one of the two Swine Men I had seen, thrust his head over the little pink sloth-creature and shouted something excitedly, something that I did not catch.
I have to attend swine for other people to eat, while he, if he yet lives to see the light of day, is starving in some distant land.
Let such men speak for themselves, who undoubtedly appear to have been spawned forth by Nature with a contemptuous bitterness; she plastered them up out of her refuse stuff, after all the swine were made.