sword-thrust

Translations

sword-thrust

[ˈsɔːdθrʌst] Nestocada f
References in classic literature ?
The warriors, startled by the unexpected appearance of a red man, stood for a moment in dumb amazement, and in that moment Gahan of Gathol was upon them, and one was down, a sword-thrust through its heart.
The officer had died of a sword-thrust through the heart, but not, apparently, until he had inflicted upon his enemy no fewer than five dreadful wounds.
The moment that the last of the fliers came to rest at the base of the shaft the black-bearded, yellow warriors swarmed over the mass of wreckage upon which they lay, making prisoners of those who were uninjured and occasionally despatching with a sword-thrust one of the wounded who seemed prone to resent their taunts and insults.
I wear this garb, thou fool, to keep my body warm; likewise it is near as good as a coat of steel against a common sword-thrust.
The wound was a sword-thrust, received from twenty to twenty- four hours before, but no skill could have saved him if it had been looked to without delay.
These men were, for the most part, guards, whose merit D'Artagnan had had an opportunity of appreciating in various encounters, whom drunkenness, unlucky sword-thrusts, unexpected winnings at play, or the economical reforms of Mazarin, had forced to seek shade and solitude, those two great consolers of irritated and chafing spirits.
I have seen war, sire, I have seen peace; I have served Richelieu and Mazarin; I have been scorched with your father, at the fire of Rochelle; riddled with sword-thrusts like a sieve, having grown a new skin ten times, as serpents do.
This sequence shows such Roman techniques as the sword-thrust through a tightly packed wall of shields, and the constant rotation of fresh troops to the deadly front line.
to a 1992 article in the Journal of tire Royal College of Physicians by medicals Margaret and Trevor Lloyd who minimise the New Testament detail of the soldier's sword-thrust producing blood and water as merely pricking a bleb caused by the flogging.
Zola departed after once more plunging a sword-thrust through the Dons' defence, just as he did in that semi-final victory at Highbury.
In this story a Federal officer, unable to stand the torment of his hideously wounded comrade, whose trailing intestines are witness to his disembowelment by rooting swine, puts the mutilated soldier out of his misery with a sword-thrust just before a rescue party arrives, accompanied by the officer's worst enemy, the victim's brother.