sycamore


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sycamore
American sycamore
Platanus occidentalis

syc·a·more

 (sĭk′ə-môr′)
n.
1. Any of various deciduous trees of the genus Platanus, especially P. occidentalis of eastern North America, having palmately lobed leaves, ball-like, nodding, hairy fruit clusters, and bark that flakes off in large pieces. Also called buttonball, buttonwood.
2. A Eurasian deciduous maple tree (Acer pseudoplatanus) having palmately lobed leaves, winged fruits, and greenish flowers.
3. A fig tree (Ficus sycomorus) of Africa and adjacent southwest Asia, mentioned in the Bible, having clusters of figs borne on short leafless twigs.

[Middle English sicamour, a kind of fig tree, from Old French sicamor, from Latin sȳcomorus, from Greek sūkomoros, perhaps of Semitic origin; see qwm in the Appendix of Semitic roots.]

sycamore

(ˈsɪkəˌmɔː)
n
1. (Plants) a Eurasian maple tree, Acer pseudoplatanus, naturalized in Britain and North America, having five-lobed leaves, yellow flowers, and two-winged fruits
2. (Plants) US and Canadian an American plane tree, Platanus occidentalis. See plane tree
3. (Plants) Also: sycomore a moraceous tree, Ficus sycomorus, of N Africa and W Asia, having an edible figlike fruit
[C14: from Old French sicamor, from Latin sӯcomorus, from Greek sukomoros, from sukon fig + moron mulberry]

syc•a•more

(ˈsɪk əˌmɔr, -ˌmoʊr)

n.
1. Also called buttonwood. any plane tree, esp. Platanus occidentalis, of E North America, having palmately lobed leaves, globular seed heads, and wood valued as timber.
2. Brit. the sycamore maple.
3. a tree, Ficus sycomorus, of the Near East, related to the common fig, bearing an edible fruit: the sycamore of the Bible.
[1300–50; < Old French < Latin sȳcomorus < Greek sȳkómoros < Semitic; compare Hebrew shiqmāh sycamore]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sycamore - variably colored and sometimes variegated hard tough elastic wood of a sycamore treesycamore - variably colored and sometimes variegated hard tough elastic wood of a sycamore tree
plane tree, platan, sycamore - any of several trees of the genus Platanus having thin pale bark that scales off in small plates and lobed leaves and ball-shaped heads of fruits
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
2.sycamore - any of several trees of the genus Platanus having thin pale bark that scales off in small plates and lobed leaves and ball-shaped heads of fruitssycamore - any of several trees of the genus Platanus having thin pale bark that scales off in small plates and lobed leaves and ball-shaped heads of fruits
genus Platanus, Platanus - genus of large monoecious mostly deciduous trees: London plane; sycamore
lacewood, sycamore - variably colored and sometimes variegated hard tough elastic wood of a sycamore tree
London plane, Platanus acerifolia - very large fast-growing tree much planted as a street tree
American plane, American sycamore, buttonwood, Platanus occidentalis - very large spreading plane tree of eastern and central North America to Mexico
oriental plane, Platanus orientalis - large tree of southeastern Europe to Asia Minor
California sycamore, Platanus racemosa - tall tree of Baja California having deciduous bark and large alternate palmately lobed leaves and ball-shaped clusters of flowers
Arizona sycamore, Platanus wrightii - medium-sized tree of Arizona and adjacent regions having deeply lobed leaves and collective fruits in groups of 3 to 5
tree - a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
3.sycamore - Eurasian maple tree with pale grey bark that peels in flakes like that of a sycamore treesycamore - Eurasian maple tree with pale grey bark that peels in flakes like that of a sycamore tree; leaves with five ovate lobes yellow in autumn
maple - any of numerous trees or shrubs of the genus Acer bearing winged seeds in pairs; north temperate zone
4.sycamore - thick-branched wide-spreading tree of Africa and adjacent southwestern Asia often buttressed with branches rising from near the groundsycamore - thick-branched wide-spreading tree of Africa and adjacent southwestern Asia often buttressed with branches rising from near the ground; produces cluster of edible but inferior figs on short leafless twigs; the biblical sycamore
Ficus, genus Ficus - large genus of tropical trees or shrubs or climbers including fig trees
fig tree - any moraceous tree of the tropical genus Ficus; produces a closed pear-shaped receptacle that becomes fleshy and edible when mature
Translations
Bergahorn

sycamore

[ˈsɪkəmɔːʳ] N (also sycamore tree) → sicomoro m, sicómoro m

sycamore

[ˈsɪkəmɔːr] n (also sycamore tree) → sycomore m

sycamore

nBergahorn m; (US: = plane tree) → nordamerikanische Platane; (= wood)Ahorn m

sycamore

[ˈsɪkəmɔːʳ] nsicomoro
References in classic literature ?
At the foot of the hill below the farmer's house Seth had stopped beneath a sycamore tree and looked about him.
She heard the barking of an old dog that was chained to the sycamore tree.
He picked up and inspected several large semi-cylinders of the thin white bark of a sycamore, and finally chose two which seemed to suit him.
The girls now came to a place where the road dipped through a plantation of sombre sycamore and horsechestnut trees.
The material was at first supposed to be the wood of the sycamore (platanus), but, upon cutting into it, we found it to be pasteboard, or, more properly, papier mache, composed of papyrus.
Various water-courses filter through, toward the east, and work their way onward to flow into the Kingani, in the midst of gigantic clumps of sycamore, tamarind, calabash, and palmyra trees.
Boxtel, hidden behind his sycamore, could not see anything, as it was pitch-dark; but the piercing cries of the cats told the whole tale, and his heart overflowing with gall now throbbed with triumphant joy.
Have Pommers ready at mid-day with my sycamore lance, and place my harness on the sumpter mule.
She led the way round the house to where tea was spread under the shade of a large sycamore.
Said he would wait for us in a little bunch of sycamores right back of Tom's uncle Silas's tobacker field on the river road, a lonesome place.
D'Artagnan had just passed the Rue Cassette, and already perceived the door of his friend's house, shaded by a mass of sycamores and clematis which formed a vast arch opposite the front of it, when he perceived something like a shadow issuing from the Rue Servandoni.
Pere Pamphile had seen Dantes pass not ten minutes before; and assured that he was at the Catalans, they sat down under the budding foliage of the planes and sycamores, in the branches of which the birds were singing their welcome to one of the first days of spring.