syllabically


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syl·lab·ic

 (sĭ-lăb′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Of, relating to, or consisting of a syllable or syllables.
b. Pronounced with every syllable distinct.
2. Linguistics Designating a sound that is or can be the most sonorant segment of a syllable, as a vowel or a resonant. In the word riddle (rĭd′l), the two syllabic sounds are the (ĭ) and the (l).
3. Of or being a form of verse based on the number of syllables in a line rather than on the arrangement of accents or quantities.
n. Linguistics
A syllabic sound.

[Medieval Latin syllabicus, from Greek sullabikos, from sullabē, syllable; see syllable.]

syl·lab′i·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.syllabically - in or with syllables; "syllabically pronounced"
References in periodicals archive ?
However, this lyricism is strongly muted by the text's avoidance of chiastic structures, the first person, rhyme, logical generalization, a more syllabically controlled meter, rise-fall intonation, exclamatives, elaborated phrases (e.
For an example of how he exercises this new-won freedom, I turn now to "Boadicea," Tennyson's syllabically inflated name of the Icenian queen of his 1859 poem.
They have either put in an extra bear when singing unaccompanied--as the true folk-song does--to give themselves time to breathe or to emphasise a certain syllable; or have left out a beat that was not syllabically provided for, thereby in either case altering the structure in a way that at once becomes remarkable when the song is given an accompaniment.
it is used syllabically with the value sa4 and logographically determining the verb sanai- 'overturn'.
He represents the early Irish syllabic poetry with short-line usually syllabically symmetrical rhymed poetry matching the stanzaic length of the Irish source and generally showing close formal-equivalence to the source poem; despite the formal constraints Carson set himself, the poetry is generally readable and pleasant.
In Isbukun Bunun, foot forms are constrained both syllabically and moraically.
These, she says, must be seen as freely incorporating something like quantitative verse, especially in those syllabically "short" lines (e.
Syllabically, the words in the two texts were also very similar with the majority of the words comprised of single syllables, and multisyllabic words appearing infrequently.
gazing syllabically at the moon or the river of blossoms.
As it is syllabically unlicensed, it remains inaudible apart from artificial or perhaps spelling-based pronunciations.
Linear melodic pitches center on D and move frequently in paired fourths and thirds that are gauged to descend syllabically to a central pitch.
Yet the viewpoint the narration veils--manifested in subtle clues and revealed details like physical description or character names (recall Macomber's perfect, prissy safari-wear, or the awkwardly pronounced "Francis Macomber" versus the terse, syllabically balanced "Robert Wilson")--shows that the narrator is not equally sympathetic to all characters and that, indeed, his sympathies (and ours