symbolic logic


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Related to symbolic logic: propositional logic

symbolic logic

n.
A treatment of formal logic in which a system of symbols is used to represent quantities and relationships. Also called mathematical logic.

symbolic logic

n
(Logic) another term for formal logic

symbol′ic log′ic


n.
a modern development of formal logic employing a special notation or symbolism capable of manipulation in accordance with precise rules. Also called mathematical logic.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.symbolic logic - any logical system that abstracts the form of statements away from their content in order to establish abstract criteria of consistency and validitysymbolic logic - any logical system that abstracts the form of statements away from their content in order to establish abstract criteria of consistency and validity
logical system, system of logic, logic - a system of reasoning
Boolean algebra, Boolean logic - a system of symbolic logic devised by George Boole; used in computers
propositional calculus, propositional logic - a branch of symbolic logic dealing with propositions as units and with their combinations and the connectives that relate them
functional calculus, predicate calculus - a system of symbolic logic that represents individuals and predicates and quantification over individuals (as well as the relations between propositions)
modal logic - a system of logic whose formal properties resemble certain moral and epistemological concepts
fuzzy logic - a form of mathematical logic in which truth can assume a continuum of values between 0 and 1
References in periodicals archive ?
Bourbaki, "Foundations of Mathematics for the Working Mathematician," Journal of Symbolic Logic 14, no.
At the beginning of the past century there were three disciplines of logic: Symbolic logic (refers to the immediate reality surrounding objects and their properties, the relationships between the states of affairs), the traditional logic (refers to what are these objects, to their essences) and speculative logic (refers to the processuality of objects).
In order to unravel this a bit further, we might consider an example not discussed by Burke: does Hamlet delay because he identifies with Claudius (Ernest Jones's argument, perhaps best refined by William Kerrigan in his Hamlet's Perfection), or is the identification demanded by the structure, and the symbolic logic, of the play?
Divided into ten lessons, the book begins at the most basic level with a discussion of symbolic logic and progresses from number theory to the principles of calculus.
In the formalist view, it is the investigation of axiomatically defined abstract structures using symbolic logic and mathematical notation; other views are described in Philosophy of mathematics.
Though in both buildings the idea of the megastructure is differently expressed, the underlying formal and symbolic logic had common denominators.
A first edition copy of Carroll's book, Symbolic Logic, Part 1, Elementary, which he signed and gave to Edith, sold for pounds 4,080.
Taking a more modest and secular approach to mathematics, the door was left open to anti-religious agendas for symbolic logic that went far beyond merely bypassing theological justification and approbation for mathematical truths.
Symbolic logic, Boole believed, would strip the ambiguities and inconsistencies present in religious dialogue and point toward a "divine plane where all knowledge converged into God's Truth" (105).
These include major advances in mathematics and symbolic logic, the development of evolutionary theory, Maxwell's field theory, relativity theory and quantum theory.
Piotr Balcerowicz, in "Implications of the Buddhist-Jaina Dispute over the Fallacious Example in [Dharmakrrtrsl Nyaya-Bindu and [Siddharsigani's] Nyayavalara-Vivrti," demonstrates at least three things: first, that in his discussion of the "fallacious example," the Jaina Siddharsigani unquestionably drew upon the work of the Buddhist Dharmaklrti, at times adopting identical wording; second, that Siddharsigani made an important and streamlining philosophical modification to the discussion by removing the "illustrative example" as an integral component, of the proof; and third, that because the Indian philosophers, unlike their Greek counterparts, did not use symbolic logic, we are better able to reconstruct historical influences and determine personal biases among the philosophers.
Many of the early chapters in this volume are efforts to situate its complex identity, especially in relationship to the more traditional field of formal or symbolic logic.

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