symbolism

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Related to symbolisms: symbolic language

sym·bol·ism

 (sĭm′bə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The practice of representing things by means of symbols or of attributing symbolic meanings or significance to objects, events, or relationships.
2. A system of symbols or representations.
3. A symbolic meaning or representation.
4. Revelation or suggestion of intangible conditions or truths by artistic invention.
5. Symbolism The movement, theory, or practice of the late 19th-century Symbolists.

symbolism

(ˈsɪmbəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. the representation of something in symbolic form or the attribution of symbolic meaning or character to something
2. a system of symbols or symbolic representation
3. a symbolic significance or quality
4. (Art Movements) (often capital) a late 19th-century movement in art that sought to express mystical or abstract ideas through the symbolic use of images. See also synthetism
5. (Theology) theol any symbolist interpretation of the Eucharist

sym•bol•ism

(ˈsɪm bəˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. the practice of representing things by symbols, or of investing things with a symbolic meaning.
2. a set or system of symbols.
3. symbolic meaning or character.
4. the principles and practice of symbolists in literature or art.
5. (cap.) the literary movement of the Symbolists.
[1645–55]

symbolism

symbology, defs. 1 and 2.
See also: Images, Representation
the principles of a literary movement originated during the latter part of the 19th century in France and highly influential in literature written in English, characterized especially by an emphasis upon the associative character of verbal, often private, symbols and the use of synesthetic devices to suggest color and music. — Symbolist, n., adj.
See also: Literature

Symbolism

 symbols collectively, 1882.

symbolism

(c 1880–1905) Influenced by the Pre-Raphaelites and by romanticism, Symbolism originated in France as an intellectual alternative to the straight visual work of the Impressionists. There were two main strands: those, e.g. Redon, influenced by literature, and those, e.g. van Gogh, who explored the symbolic use of color and line to express emotion.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.symbolism - a system of symbols and symbolic representationssymbolism - a system of symbols and symbolic representations
symbol - an arbitrary sign (written or printed) that has acquired a conventional significance
2.symbolism - the practice of investing things with symbolic meaning
practice, pattern - a customary way of operation or behavior; "it is their practice to give annual raises"; "they changed their dietary pattern"
3.symbolism - an artistic movement in the late 19th century that tried to express abstract or mystical ideas through the symbolic use of images
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
Translations
رَمْزِيَّه
symbolismus
symbolisme
jelképes ábrázolásszimbolikus ábrázolás
notkun tákna; táknkerfi; symbólismi
symbolizmus
sembolizmsimgecilik

symbolism

[ˈsɪmbəlɪzəm] Nsimbolismo m

symbolism

[ˈsɪmbəlɪzəm] nsymbolisme m

symbolism

nSymbolik f; (Art, Liter, = movement) → Symbolismus m

symbolism

[ˈsɪmbəˌlɪzm] nsimbolismo

symbol

(ˈsimbəl) noun
a thing that is regarded as representing or standing for another. The dove is the symbol of peace.
symˈbolic (-ˈbo-) adjective
In the Christian religion, bread and wine are symbolic of Christ's body and blood.
symˈbolically adverb
ˈsymbolize, ˈsymbolise verb
to be a symbol of or represent by a symbol. A ring symbolizes everlasting love.
ˈsymbolism noun

sym·bol·ism

n. simbolismo.
1. uso de símbolos en la práctica para dar una representación a las cosas;
2. anormalidad mental por la cual el paciente percibe todos los sucesos y cosas como reflejos de sus propios pensamientos.
References in classic literature ?
Nothing could show more clearly the kind of child she was than the fact that she instantly perceived the symbolism of the rose, and laid it in the drawer with the dress as if she were burying the whole episode with all its sad memories.
the hermetic symbolism, with which Nicolas Flamel played the prelude to Luther, papal unity, schism, Saint-Germain des Prés, Saint-Jacques de la Boucherie,--all are mingled, combined, amalgamated in Notre-Dame.
What is the author's attitude toward Nature--(1) does he view Nature in a purely objective way, as a mass of material things, a series of material phenomena or a mere embodiment of sensuous beauty; or (2) is there symbolism or mysticism in his attitude, that is--does he view Nature with awe as a spiritual power; or (3) is he thoroughly subjective, reading his own moods into Nature or using Nature chiefly for the expression of his moods?