symmetry


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symmetry
top: bilateral symmetry
bottom: radial symmetry

sym·me·try

 (sĭm′ĭ-trē)
n. pl. sym·me·tries
1. The correspondence of the form and arrangement of elements or parts on opposite sides of a dividing line or plane or about a center or an axis: the symmetry of a butterfly's wings.
2. A relationship in which there is correspondence or similarity between entities or parts: the symmetry of the play, which opens and ends with a speech by a female character.
3. Beauty as a result of pleasing proportions or harmonious arrangement: "Here were the ringlets, framing a face of exquisite symmetry" (Clive Barker).
4. Physics Invariance under transformation. For example, a system that is invariant under rotation has rotational symmetry.

[Latin symmetria, from Greek summetriā, from summetros, of like measure : sun-, syn- + metron, measure; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]

symmetry

(ˈsɪmɪtrɪ)
n, pl -tries
1. similarity, correspondence, or balance among systems or parts of a system
2. (Mathematics) maths an exact correspondence in position or form about a given point, line, or plane. See symmetrical2
3. beauty or harmony of form based on a proportionate arrangement of parts
4. (General Physics) physics the independence of a property with respect to direction; isotropy
[C16: from Latin symmetria, from Greek summetria proportion, from syn- + metron measure]

sym•me•try

(ˈsɪm ɪ tri)

n., pl. -tries.
1. the correspondence in size, form, and arrangement of parts on opposite sides of a plane, line, or point; regularity of form or arrangement in terms of like, reciprocal, or corresponding parts.
2. the proper or due proportion of the parts of a body or whole to one another with regard to size and form; excellence of proportion.
3. beauty based on or characterized by such excellence of proportion.
4. a type of regularity, as of a circle or other plane figure, that is characterized by the geometric operations, as rotation or reflection, that leave a figure unchanged.
5. a property of a physical system that allows the system to remain unchanged by a specific physical or mathematical transformation, as rotation or translation.
[1535–45; < Latin symmetria < Greek symmetría. See sym-, -metry]
syn: symmetry, balance, proportion, harmony all denote qualities based on a correspondence or agreement, usu. pleasing, among the parts of a whole. symmetry implies a regularity in form and arrangement of corresponding parts: the perfect symmetry of pairs of matched columns. balance implies equilibrium of dissimilar parts, often as a means of emphasis: a balance of humor and seriousness. proportion implies a proper relation among parts: His long arms were not in proportion to his body. harmony suggests a consistent, pleasing, or orderly combination of parts: harmony of color.

sym·me·try

(sĭm′ĭ-trē)
An exact matching of form and arrangement of parts on opposite sides of a boundary, such as a plane or line, or around a central point or axis.

Symmetry

See also form.

the quality or condition of lacking symmetry. — asymmetrical, asymmetric, adj.
Botany. the condition of having two planes of symmetry at right angles to one another. — bisymmetric, bisymmetrical, adj.
1. the state exhibited by a crystal, having three unequal axes with one oblique intersection; the state of being monoclinic. See also biology.
2. Biology. the state of being zygomorphic, or bilaterally symmetric, or divisible into symmetrical halves by one plane only. See also zygomorphism. See also PHYSICS.monosymmetric, monosymmetrical, adj.
a mania for symmetry.
an abnormal fear or dislike of symmetry.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.symmetry - (mathematics) an attribute of a shape or relationsymmetry - (mathematics) an attribute of a shape or relation; exact reflection of form on opposite sides of a dividing line or plane
spatial property, spatiality - any property relating to or occupying space
geometrical regularity, regularity - a property of polygons: the property of having equal sides and equal angles
bilateral symmetry, bilateralism, bilaterality - the property of being symmetrical about a vertical plane
radial symmetry - the property of symmetry about an axis; "the starfish illustrates radial symmetry"
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
asymmetry, dissymmetry, imbalance - (mathematics) a lack of symmetry
2.symmetry - balance among the parts of something
equipoise, counterbalance, equilibrium, balance - equality of distribution
3.symmetry - (physics) the property of being isotropic; having the same value when measured in different directions
property - a basic or essential attribute shared by all members of a class; "a study of the physical properties of atomic particles"
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"

symmetry

noun
1. balance, proportion, regularity, form, order, harmony, correspondence, evenness the incredible beauty and symmetry of a snowflake
2. equality, agreement, balance, proportion, coordination, concord The superpowers pledged to maintain symmetry in their arms shipments.

symmetry

noun
Satisfying arrangement marked by even distribution of elements, as in a design:
Translations
تَماثُل، تَناسُق
simetria
symetriesouměrnost
symmetri
simetrija
szimmetria
samhverfa
simetrijasimetriškai
simetrija
symetria
simetrija
simetrija
ความสมดุลความสมมาตร
bakışımsimetri

symmetry

[ˈsɪmɪtrɪ] Nsimetría f

symmetry

[ˈsɪmɪtri] nsymétrie f

symmetry

nSymmetrie f

symmetry

[ˈsɪmɪtrɪ] nsimmetria
line symmetry → simmetria rispetto a una retta
rotational symmetry → simmetria rotazionale

symmetry

(ˈsimitri) noun
the state in which two parts, on either side of a dividing line, are equal in size, shape and position.
symˈmetrical (-ˈme-) adjective
having symmetry. The two sides of a person's face are never completely symmetrical.
symˈmetrically adverb

sym·me·try

n. simetría, correspondencia perfecta entre partes de un cuerpo colocadas en posición opuesta a un centro o axis.

symmetry

n simetría
References in classic literature ?
They received Pierre in their small, new drawing-room, where it was impossible to sit down anywhere without disturbing its symmetry, neatness, and order; so it was quite comprehensible and not strange that Berg, having generously offered to disturb the symmetry of an armchair or of the sofa for his dear guest, but being apparently painfully undecided on the matter himself, eventually left the visitor to settle the question of selection.
I am afraid you find it quite impossible to keep her up at heel, or to mold her personal appearance into harmony with the eternal laws of symmetry and order.
She is delicately fair, with fine grey eyes and dark eyelashes; and from her appearance one would not suppose her more than five and twenty, though she must in fact be ten years older, I was certainly not disposed to admire her, though always hearing she was beautiful; but I cannot help feeling that she possesses an uncommon union of symmetry, brilliancy, and grace.
Revolutions in state will also arise from a disproportionate increase; for as the body consists of many parts, it ought to increase proportion-ably to preserve its symmetry, which would otherwise be destroyed; as if the foot was to be four cubits long, and the rest of the body but two palms; it might otherwise [1303a] be changed into an animal of a different form, if it increase beyond proportion not only in quantity, but also in disposition of parts; so also a city consists of parts, some of which may often increase without notice, as the number of poor in democracies and free states.
Her shape was not only exact, but extremely delicate: and the nice proportion of her arms promised the truest symmetry in her limbs.
geometrical symmetry, of clearness, of definiteness.
Surely the hedges are shaped and measured and their symmetry preserved by the most architectural of gardeners.
In works on natural history rudimentary organs are generally said to have been created 'for the sake of symmetry,' or in order 'to complete the scheme of nature;' but this seems to me no explanation, merely a restatement of the fact.
Both are massive enough in all conscience; but there is a certain mathematical symmetry in the Sperm Whale's which the Right Whale's sadly lacks.
The founder of the City of the Saints could not escape from the taste for symmetry which distinguishes the Anglo-Saxons.
Would it be wonderful if, under the pressure of all these difficulties, the convention should have been forced into some deviations from that artificial structure and regular symmetry which an abstract view of the subject might lead an ingenious theorist to bestow on a Constitution planned in his closet or in his imagination?
Though he had detected with a critical eye more than one failure of perfect symmetry in her form, he was forced to acknowledge her figure to be light and pleasing; and in spite of his asserting that her manners were not those of the fashionable world, he was caught by their easy playfulness.