symphony

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sym·pho·ny

 (sĭm′fə-nē)
n. pl. sym·pho·nies
1. Music
a. An extended piece in three or more movements for symphony orchestra.
b. An instrumental passage in a vocal or choral composition.
c. An instrumental overture or interlude, as in early opera.
2. Music
a. A symphony orchestra.
b. An orchestral concert.
3. Harmony, especially of sound or color.
4. Something characterized by a harmonious combination of elements.

[Middle English symphonye, harmony, from Old French symphonie, from Latin symphōnia, from Greek sumphōniā, from sumphōnos, harmonious : sun-, syn- + phōnē, sound; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]

symphony

(ˈsɪmfənɪ)
n, pl -nies
1. (Classical Music) an extended large-scale orchestral composition, usually with several movements, at least one of which is in sonata form. The classical form of the symphony was fixed by Haydn and Mozart, but the innovations of subsequent composers have freed it entirely from classical constraints. It continues to be a vehicle for serious, large-scale orchestral music
2. (Classical Music) a piece of instrumental music in up to three very short movements, used as an overture to or interlude in a baroque opera
3. (Classical Music) any purely orchestral movement in a vocal work, such as a cantata or oratorio
4. (Classical Music) short for symphony orchestra
5. (Classical Music) (in musical theory, esp of classical Greece)
a. another word for consonance3 Compare diaphony2
b. the interval of unison
6. anything distinguished by a harmonious composition: the picture was a symphony of green.
7. archaic harmony in general; concord
[C13: from Old French symphonie, from Latin symphōnia concord, concert, from Greek sumphōnia, from syn- + phōnē sound]
symphonic adj
symˈphonically adv

sym•pho•ny

(ˈsɪm fə ni)

n., pl. -nies.
1.
a. an extended sonatalike musical composition for large orchestra.
3. a concert performed by a symphony orchestra.
4. anything characterized by a harmonious combination of elements, esp. an effective combination of colors.
5. harmony of sounds.
6. Archaic. agreement; concord.
[1250–1300; Middle English symfonye < Old French symphonie < Latin symphōnia concert < Greek symphōnía harmony. See sym-, -phony]

Symphony

 a collection of sounds; a chorus; a collection of musical sounds or attractive colours, 1874.
Examples: symphony of colour, 1874; of commendations, 1654; of laughter, 1713; of the ocean, 1849.

symphony

An extended orchestral work, usually in four movements.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.symphony - a long and complex sonata for symphony orchestrasymphony - a long and complex sonata for symphony orchestra
sonata - a musical composition of 3 or 4 movements of contrasting forms
2.symphony - a large orchestrasymphony - a large orchestra; can perform symphonies; "we heard the Vienna symphony"
orchestra - a musical organization consisting of a group of instrumentalists including string players

symphony

noun
Pleasing agreement, as of musical sounds:
Music: consonance.
Translations
symfonie
symfoni
sinfonia
simfonija
szimfónia
sinfónía
交響曲
교향곡
simfonijasimfoninis
simfonijasimfōnija
symfónia
simfonija
symfoni
เพลงสำหรับวงดนตรีประสานเสียงขนาดใหญ่
nhạc giao hưởng

symphony

[ˈsɪmfənɪ]
A. Nsinfonía f
B. CPD symphony orchestra Norquesta f sinfónica

symphony

[ˈsɪmfəni] nsymphonie fsymphony orchestra norchestre m symphonique

symphony

nSinfonie f, → Symphonie f; a symphony of colours (liter)eine Sinfonie von Farben, eine Farbensinfonie

symphony

[ˈsɪmfənɪ] nsinfonia

symphony

(ˈsimfəni) plural ˈsymphonies noun
a usually long piece of music for an orchestra of many different instruments, in three or four movements or parts.
symˈphonic (-ˈfo-) adjective

symphony

سِيمْفُونِيَّة symfonie symfoni Sinfonie συμφωνία sinfonía sinfonia symphonie simfonija sinfonia 交響曲 교향곡 symfonie symfoni symfonia sinfonia симфония symfoni เพลงสำหรับวงดนตรีประสานเสียงขนาดใหญ่ senfoni nhạc giao hưởng 交响乐
References in classic literature ?
Anon out of the earth a Fabrick huge Rose like an Exhalation, with the sound Of Dulcet Symphonies and voices sweet, Built like a Temple, where PILASTERS round Were set, and Doric pillars overlaid With Golden Architrave; nor did there want Cornice or Freeze, with bossy Sculptures grav'n, The Roof was fretted Gold.
Our caresses, our tender words, our still rapture under the influence of autumn sunsets, or pillared vistas, or calm majestic statues, or Beethoven symphonies all bring with them the consciousness that they are mere waves and ripples in an unfathomable ocean of love and beauty; our emotion in its keenest moment passes from expression into silence, our love at its highest flood rushes beyond its object and loses itself in the sense of divine mystery.
And he made immortal music; now in melodies as exquisite and varied as the songs of Schubert, and now in symphonies where the crudest of Philosophies of History melted into golden harmony.
We were perpetually talking of our Oratorios, and they were perpetually talking of their Symphonies.
Jarvi's accounts are characterised by contrastive tempos, both audaciously slow (the first movements of Symphonies Nos.
In this, the second of two all-Brahms programs, Dohnanyi led the orchestra in the Symphonies Nos.
Cellist Darrett Adkins is an assistant faculty member at The Juilliard School, whose recent appearances include standard concertos with the Tokyo Philharmonic, Tochio Soloisten, North Carolina and New Hampshire Symphonies.
He has produced symphonies, song cycles, chamber music, and a commissioned work for the Metropolitan Opera, The Ghosts of Versailles, which had its triumphant premiere in 1991.
The Gracenote Classical Music Initiative has received support and endorsements from classical artists, experts, critics, and customers including symphonies such as the San Francisco Symphony, London Symphony Orchestra, New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, and Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra; music labels Naxos and Harmonia-Mundi; and top classical music scholars and authors.
Now he is in Los Angeles for two weeks, leading all four Brahms symphonies -- Symphonies One and Three this weekend, and Symphonies Two and Four next.
The Los Angeles Philharmonic calls Esa-Pekka Salonen's survey of Beethoven's symphonies Beethoven Unbound, but perhaps Beethoven Unleashed is a more fitting title.