synapse

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synapse

syn·apse

 (sĭn′ăps′, sĭ-năps′)
n.
The junction across which a nerve impulse passes from an axon terminal to a neuron, muscle cell, or gland cell.
intr.v. syn·apsed, syn·aps·ing, syn·aps·es
1. To form a synapse.
2. To undergo synapsis.

[Greek sunapsis, point of contact, from sunaptein, to join together : sun-, syn- + haptein, to fasten.]

synapse

(ˈsaɪnæps)
n
(Physiology) the point at which a nerve impulse is relayed from the terminal portion of an axon to the dendrites of an adjacent neuron

syn•apse

(ˈsɪn æps, sɪˈnæps)

n., v. -apsed, -aps•ing. n.
1.
a. a region where nerve impulses are transmitted across a small gap from an axon terminal to an adjacent structure, as another axon or the end plate of a muscle.
b. Also called synap′tic gap′. the gap itself.
v.i.
2. to form a synapse or a synapsis.
[1895–1900; back formation from synapses, pl. of synapsis]

syn·apse

(sĭn′ăps′)
The gap across which a nerve impulse passes from one nerve cell to another nerve cell, a muscle cell, or a gland cell.

synapse

The junction between two neurons.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.synapse - the junction between two neurons (axon-to-dendrite) or between a neuron and a muscle; "nerve impulses cross a synapse through the action of neurotransmitters"
myoneural junction, neuromuscular junction - the junction between a nerve fiber and the muscle it supplies
nerve, nervus - any bundle of nerve fibers running to various organs and tissues of the body
colligation, conjugation, conjunction, junction - the state of being joined together
Translations
synapsi
sinapsa
synaps

synapse

[ˈsaɪnæps] Nsinapsis f

synapse

n (Physiol) → Synapse f

synapse

[ˈsaɪnæps] nsinapsi f

syn·apse

n. sinapsis, punto de contacto entre dos neuronas donde el impulso que pasa por la primera neurona origina un impulso en la segunda.

synapse

n sinapsis f
References in periodicals archive ?
Both the real and artificial synapses can thus maintain old circuits and create new ones.
Understanding how the synapses function and learning ways to strengthen and protect them can help you maintain an alert and active mind at any age.
1) In the mammalian forebrain, synaptogenesis starts before birth, but the number of synapses significantly increases in the early postnatal period.
Objective: In neuronal networks of the brain, synapses are the connection points between neurons.
The new work pins the loss of synapses, which connect nerve cells, on particular immune system molecules and a notorious Alzheimer's-linked protein.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is due to a slowdown in a normal brain "pruning" process during development, according to a new study.
The researchers believe this repeated process is what helps the cells determine which synapses to keep -- and which to let wither.
Synapses are the connections that exist between nerve cells or nerves and the muscles that they control.
Topics include cell adhesion molecules at the Drosophilia neuromuscular junction, synapse formation in the mammalian central nervous system, developmental axonal pruning and synaptic plasticity, cell adhesion molecules in synatopathies, the cadherin superfamily in synapse formation and function, nectins and nectin-like molecules in the nervous system, the Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule, molecular basis of lamina-specific synaptic connections in the retina, cell adhesion molecules of the NCAM family and their roles at synapses, ephrins and eph receptor tyrosine kinases in synapse formation, the role of integrins at synapses, and extracellular matrix molecules in neuromuscular junctions and central nervous system synapses.
Here we describe the invaginated synapses of four species of cubomedusae.
Prana Biotechnology (Melbourne, Australia) announced that an independent study conducted by researchers at the University of California, Irvine, validates Prana's fundamental drug strategy for Alzheimer's Disease in blocking the toxic interaction between Abeta and brain metals, such as zinc, that damages synapses and cause cognitive loss.
Neurons are separated by tiny gaps called synapses.