synchronic


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Related to synchronic: synchronic linguistics

syn·chron·ic

 (sĭn-krŏn′ĭk, sĭng-)
adj.
1. Synchronous.
2. Of or relating to the study of phenomena, such as linguistic features, or of events of a particular time, without reference to their historical context.

syn·chron′i·cal·ly adv.

synchronic

(sɪnˈkrɒnɪk)
adj
1. concerned with the events or phenomena at a particular period without considering historical antecedents: synchronic linguistics. Compare diachronic
2. synchronous
synˈchronically adv

syn•chron•ic

(sɪnˈkrɒn ɪk, sɪŋ-)

adj.
of or pertaining to the study of a language as it exists at one point in time without reference to its history: synchronic linguistics. Compare diachronic.
[1825–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.synchronic - occurring or existing at the same time or having the same period or phase; "recovery was synchronous with therapy"- Jour.A.M.A.; "a synchronous set of clocks"; "the synchronous action of a bird's wings in flight"; "synchronous oscillations"
synchronic - concerned with phenomena (especially language) at a particular period without considering historical antecedents; "synchronic linguistics"
2.synchronic - concerned with phenomena (especially language) at a particular period without considering historical antecedents; "synchronic linguistics"
language, linguistic communication - a systematic means of communicating by the use of sounds or conventional symbols; "he taught foreign languages"; "the language introduced is standard throughout the text"; "the speed with which a program can be executed depends on the language in which it is written"
synchronal, synchronic, synchronous - occurring or existing at the same time or having the same period or phase; "recovery was synchronous with therapy"- Jour.A.M.A.; "a synchronous set of clocks"; "the synchronous action of a bird's wings in flight"; "synchronous oscillations"
diachronic, historical - used of the study of a phenomenon (especially language) as it changes through time; "diachronic linguistics"
3.synchronic - (of taxa) occurring in the same period of geological time
synchronal, synchronic, synchronous - occurring or existing at the same time or having the same period or phase; "recovery was synchronous with therapy"- Jour.A.M.A.; "a synchronous set of clocks"; "the synchronous action of a bird's wings in flight"; "synchronous oscillations"

synchronic

adjective
Belonging to the same period of time as another:
Translations

synchronic

[sɪŋˈkrɒnɪk] ADJsincrónico

synchronic

adj (Ling) → synchronisch
References in periodicals archive ?
Their topics include the history of the Franconian tone contrast, grounding Nguni depressor effects, Livonian stod, and synchronic alterations between monophthongs and diphthongs in Franconian tone accent dialects: a metrical approach.
Tenders are invited for Bhavna/Bhavna Computer Chair Adjustable Cum Revolving Type Size In Wxdxh Mm : 725X725x1120, Seat Height Mm : 425 /-10, Seat Adj Mm : 100, Type : Synchronic Tilt, Seat Size : Single Seat 500 /-25, Back Type : Fixed Back, Arm Set : With, Drg.
Oestes's literary treatment of Joshua, or Ko's synchronic reading of the Twelve) more interested in the world of the text itself than in recovering the historical realities behind it.
The United States' electrical grid is a vast justa[euro]ina[euro]time network that requires constant load balancing, and relies on a synchronic operating methodology that does not lend itself well to intermittent activity, such as renewable energy generation.
Slobodanka Jovanovska in Utrinski vesnik reminds that all policies and practices of the Government receive synchronic attack, and the most important warning is--finding not only political but also court outcome to the developments.
Synchronic historicism has also been a conversation stopper, for different reasons, derived from Foucault, with regard to the relation of late medieval culture and Shakespeare.
Gustafsson demonstrates this point by formulating a synchronic analogue of the diachronic money pump.
The diachronic and synchronic (in other words, evolutionary and structural) descriptions of the object are mutually complementary, and as such, they do not contradict each other.
Drawing on both synchronic and diachronic data, he finds that the shift is not complete and is progressing at different rates, that the type of action influences how it is represented, that all the languages were more verb-framed during the 19th century than they are now, and that the typological change over the past two centuries correlates with the change of Chinese from a monosyllabic to a disyllabic language.
If the diachronic moneypump argument is cogent, so is a more direct synchronic argument.
In answer to this criticism, a synchronic approach is proposed in this article.
These events have been synchronic with Cimerian or upper Hercenian cycle.