syncretism


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syn·cre·tism

 (sĭng′krĭ-tĭz′əm, sĭn′-)
n.
1. Reconciliation or fusion of differing systems of belief, as in philosophy or religion, especially when success is partial or the result is heterogeneous.
2. Linguistics The merging of two or more originally different inflectional forms.

[Greek sunkrētismos, union, from sunkrētizein, to unite (in the manner of the Cretan cities) : sun-, syn- + Krēs, Krēt-, Cretan.]

syn·cret′ic (-krĕt′ĭk), syn′cre·tis′tic (-krĭ-tĭs′tĭk) adj.
syn′cre·tist n.

syncretism

(ˈsɪŋkrɪˌtɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) the tendency to syncretize
2. (Linguistics) the historical tendency of languages to reduce their use of inflection, as in the development of Old English with all its case endings into Modern English
[C17: from New Latin syncrētismus, from Greek sunkrētismos alliance of Cretans, from sunkrētizein to join forces (in the manner of the Cretan towns), from syn- + Krēs a Cretan]
syncretic, ˌsyncreˈtistic adj
ˈsyncretist n

syn•cre•tism

(ˈsɪŋ krɪˌtɪz əm, ˈsɪn-)

n.
1. the attempted reconciliation or union of different or opposing principles, practices, or parties, as in philosophy or religion.
2. the merging, as by historical change in a language, of two or more inflectional categories into one, as the use in nonstandard English of was with both singular and plural subjects.
[1610–20; < New Latin syncretismus < Greek synkrētismós union of Cretans « syn- syn- + Krēt-, Krḗs a Cretan]
syn•cret•ic (sɪnˈkrɛt ɪk) syn`cre•tis′tic (-ˈtɪs tɪk) adj.
syn′cre•tist, n.

syncretism

the attempted reconciliation of different or opposing principles, practices, or parties, as in philosophy or religion. — syncretic, syncretical, syncretistic, syncretistical, adj.
See also: Philosophy
the attempted reconciliation or union of different or opposing principles, practices, parties, or denominations, as in the late 19th- and 20th-century discussions between Anglo-Catholics and Roman authorities. — syncretic, syncretical, syncretistic, syncretistical, adj.
See also: Protestantism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.syncretism - the union (or attempted fusion) of different systems of thought or belief (especially in religion or philosophy); "a syncretism of material and immaterial theories"
unification, union - the state of being joined or united or linked; "there is strength in union"
2.syncretism - the fusion of originally different inflected forms (resulting in a reduction in the use of inflections)
fusion - the merging of adjacent sounds or syllables or words
Translations

syncretism

[ˈsɪŋkrətɪzəm] Nsincretismo m

syncretism

n (Ling) → Synkretismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides being intentionally designed to be cute, to match the rest of the King Garden wedding park where it is located, the "Cupid Church" is also a curious example of religious syncretism in Taiwan's often eclectic culture.
ISLAMABAD:A lecture on Dissolving Boundries: Guru Granth Sahib a symbol of cultural syncretism would be held here at National Institute of Folk and Traditional Heritage (Lok Virsa) on Jan 8.
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ISLAMABAD -- A lecture on Dissolving Boundries: Guru Granth Sahib a symbol of cultural syncretism would be held here at National Institute of Folk and Traditional Heritage (Lok Virsa) on Jan 8.
Their topics include Gnosticism as inherently syncretistic: identity construction among ancient Christians and Protestant apologetics, responding to syncretism, assessing Catholic-Buddhist "dual-belonging" in the light of the Catholic magisterium, syncretism and making sense of empirical data, and syncretism or inclusivist subordination: an exploration into the dynamics of inter-religious cooperation.
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In fact, Chrislam provides a rationale for scrutinizing the very concept of syncretism and offers an alternative analytical case for understanding its mode of religious pluralism.
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He was addressing the launching ceremony of books titled Leading Lights: the north stars of Pakistan's marginalized religious communities by Ms Bushra Sultana, and Beyond the Other: roots of religious syncretism in Pakistan by Haroon Khalid.
This first chapter demonstrates the importance of their individual interests and exposures, and the process of syncretism and religious innovation that resulted from their encounter.