synecdoche


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syn·ec·do·che

 (sĭ-nĕk′də-kē)
n.
A figure of speech in which the name of a part is used to stand for the whole (as hand for sailor), the whole for a part (as the law for police officer), the specific for the general (as cutthroat for assassin), the general for the specific (as thief for pickpocket), or the material for the thing made from it (as steel for sword).

[Middle English synodoches, from Medieval Latin synodoche, alteration of Latin synecdochē, from Greek sunekdokhē, from sunekdekhesthai, to take on a share of : sun-, syn- + ekdekhesthai, to understand (ek-, out of; see eghs in Indo-European roots + dekhesthai, to take; see dek- in Indo-European roots).]

syn′ec·doch′ic (sĭn′ĕk-dŏk′ĭk), syn′ec·doch′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

synecdoche

(sɪnˈɛkdəkɪ)
n
(Linguistics) a figure of speech in which a part is substituted for a whole or a whole for a part, as in 50 head of cattle for 50 cows, or the army for a soldier
[C14: via Latin from Greek sunekdokhē, from syn- + ekdokhē interpretation, from dekhesthai to accept]
synecdochic, ˌsynecˈdochical adj
ˌsynecˈdochically adv

syn•ec•do•che

(sɪˈnɛk də ki)

n.
a figure of speech in which a part is used for the whole or the whole for a part, the special for the general or the general for the special, as in ten sail for ten ships or a Croesus for a rich man.
[1350–1400; < Latin synecdochē < Greek, =syn- syn- + ekdochḗ, v. derivative of ekdéchesthai to receive, understand = ek- ec- + déchesthai to receive]
syn•ec•doch•ic (ˌsɪn ɪkˈdɒk ɪk) syn`ec•doch′i•cal, adj.
syn`ec•doch′i•cal•ly, adv.

synecdoche

the use of a part for a whole or a whole for a part, the special for the general or the general for the special, as in “a Rockefeller” for a rich man or “wheels” for transportation. — synecdochic, synecdochical, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

synecdoche

1. An expression in which part of something is used to stand for the whole (as in “a sail” to mean “a ship”), or the whole is used to mean a part (as in “The navy arrived.” to mean A sailor arrived.”).
2. A figure of speech where use of a part stands for the whole.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.synecdoche - substituting a more inclusive term for a less inclusive one or vice versa
fireside, hearth - home symbolized as a part of the fireplace; "driven from hearth and home"; "fighting in defense of their firesides"
figure of speech, trope, image, figure - language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
face - a part of a person that is used to refer to a person; "he looked out at a roomful of faces"; "when he returned to work he met many new faces"
Translations
synekdocha
Synekdoche

synecdoche

[sɪˈnekdəkɪ] Nsinécdoque f

synecdoche

nSynekdoche f
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