synecdoche


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

syn·ec·do·che

 (sĭ-nĕk′də-kē)
n.
A figure of speech in which the name of a part is used to stand for the whole (as hand for sailor), the whole for a part (as the law for police officer), the specific for the general (as cutthroat for assassin), the general for the specific (as thief for pickpocket), or the material for the thing made from it (as steel for sword).

[Middle English synodoches, from Medieval Latin synodoche, alteration of Latin synecdochē, from Greek sunekdokhē, from sunekdekhesthai, to take on a share of : sun-, syn- + ekdekhesthai, to understand (ek-, out of; see eghs in Indo-European roots + dekhesthai, to take; see dek- in Indo-European roots).]

syn′ec·doch′ic (sĭn′ĕk-dŏk′ĭk), syn′ec·doch′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

synecdoche

(sɪnˈɛkdəkɪ)
n
(Linguistics) a figure of speech in which a part is substituted for a whole or a whole for a part, as in 50 head of cattle for 50 cows, or the army for a soldier
[C14: via Latin from Greek sunekdokhē, from syn- + ekdokhē interpretation, from dekhesthai to accept]
synecdochic, ˌsynecˈdochical adj
ˌsynecˈdochically adv

syn•ec•do•che

(sɪˈnɛk də ki)

n.
a figure of speech in which a part is used for the whole or the whole for a part, the special for the general or the general for the special, as in ten sail for ten ships or a Croesus for a rich man.
[1350–1400; < Latin synecdochē < Greek, =syn- syn- + ekdochḗ, v. derivative of ekdéchesthai to receive, understand = ek- ec- + déchesthai to receive]
syn•ec•doch•ic (ˌsɪn ɪkˈdɒk ɪk) syn`ec•doch′i•cal, adj.
syn`ec•doch′i•cal•ly, adv.

synecdoche

the use of a part for a whole or a whole for a part, the special for the general or the general for the special, as in “a Rockefeller” for a rich man or “wheels” for transportation. — synecdochic, synecdochical, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

synecdoche

1. An expression in which part of something is used to stand for the whole (as in “a sail” to mean “a ship”), or the whole is used to mean a part (as in “The navy arrived.” to mean A sailor arrived.”).
2. A figure of speech where use of a part stands for the whole.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.synecdoche - substituting a more inclusive term for a less inclusive one or vice versa
fireside, hearth - home symbolized as a part of the fireplace; "driven from hearth and home"; "fighting in defense of their firesides"
figure of speech, trope, image, figure - language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
face - a part of a person that is used to refer to a person; "he looked out at a roomful of faces"; "when he returned to work he met many new faces"
Translations
synekdocha
Synekdoche

synecdoche

[sɪˈnekdəkɪ] Nsinécdoque f

synecdoche

nSynekdoche f
References in periodicals archive ?
As a synecdoche for the party's inability to gain political or cultural traction, the song "William Weld in the 21st Century" has seemingly nothing to do with Weld's role as a third-party candidate.
3) A fuller theorization of synecdoche, metonymy, and scale is outside the scope of this essay, but I conclude with a brief discussion of the synecdoche/metonymy distinction and its purchase on how concerns of scientism have inflected skepticisms of both "close reading" during the 1940s and 50s and "distant reading" in the twenty-first century.
The Arc is often reduced to a mere synecdoche for Paris, but in Tassin's mind, it takes on historical specificity.
Synecdoche, New York's writer and director, Charlie Kaufman, cares as deeply about names as his protagonist.
The ruling could be seen as an example of synecdoche, in which a part of something is taken to stand for its whole, or vice versa.
He focuses on the structural components of their accounts and uses the poetic concepts of metaphor, synecdoche, metonymy, and irony as means to characterize the dominant modes of historical thinking during the period, as well as romance, comedy, tragedy, and satire as the types of stories used by historians to provide a plot structure.
The window is synecdoche, is Eagle itself--a lens, a monocular, framing the wild, holding the vision that draws people up the long trail to the edge of things to have a look and see.
The very confusingly named First Blood Part II SYNECDOCHE, NEW YORK (BBC Two, 12.
The very confusingly |named First Blood Part II Synecdoche, New York (BBC Two, 12.
This difference is more crystallized in the two languages' realization of the synecdoche.
Importantly, Cross uses the concept of synecdoche to support this contention, arguing that the mention of baptism in passages such as 1 Peter 3:21 (baptism .
Her other film credits have included The Station Agent, Synecdoche, New York, Shutter Island, Take This Waltz and Oz the Great and Powerful.