synedrion


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synedrion

(sɪˈnɛdrɪən)
n
1. (Law) an assembly of judges or representatives
2. (Sociology) an assembly of judges or representatives
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Sanders commenting on some trials of Herod's relatives, states that Herod convened a synedrion recommended by Augustus in order to give the "semblance of legality" to a decision already taken for elimination.
This is the only passage that mentions synedrion, the council.
The Hebrew synedrion, translated as Sanhedrin, means "sitting together": Its members did so in a semi-circle in the Temple complex.
As far as the relationship between the decrees is concerned, the generally accepted interpretation, put forward by Wilhelm and Accame, is that the decree of the synedrion is in fact the diallagai mentioned in the Athenian decree above (lines 7-8), and that the Athenian decree orders the recording of these on the same stele.
This inscription represents the only extant document of the synedrion of the Second Athenian League.
The decrees of the Athenian assembly and the synedrion concerning Paros date to July 372, while Timotheos had returned to Athens for trial at least by November 373, or shortly thereafter.
The decrees of the assembly and the synedrion from July 372, then, would represent a final resolution of the problems on Paros; we could envision a wrapping up of business on the final day of the year.
hacia asumir al synedrion de Corinto la responsabilidad de la destruccion de Tebas, que se habia sublevado en su contra.
7) Further, the inscription decrees that, as a result of the deliberations of the Boule and an implied vote of the Demos, the Athenians and the League allies are to render oaths and then send ambassadors to receive oaths, in accordance with the synedrion of the League.
Though in this treaty Athenian actions are bound by the synedrion of the League, the treaty itself is not as explicit as many scholars would desire it to be concerning the position of Kerkyra (or of Athens) vis-a-vis the League.
There are two possible interpretations that follow from the general implications of this clause: either (i) Kerkyra entered into a treaty and placed itself in a markedly subordinate position to-Athens and the League, or (ii) Kerkyra implicitly entered the League and agreed to be bound by decisions of the synedrion of which it was a member, thus retaining nominal autonomy.
The uniqueness of this document lies not in its casual allowance for interference in the internal affairs of other states without reference to the synedrion, but in its being an example of a type of document only otherwise mentioned in literary sources: the prohibition by a state against its citizens serving in a foreign army hostile to a third state with whom `friendly' or neutral relations were desired.