synonym

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syn·o·nym

 (sĭn′ə-nĭm′)
n.
1. A word having the same or nearly the same meaning as another word or other words in a language.
2. A word or expression that serves as a figurative or symbolic substitute for another: "Romeo has become a synonym for any youthful lover" (Harry Levin).
3. Biology One of two or more scientific names that have been applied to the same species or other taxonomic group.

[Middle English sinonyme, from Old French synonyme, from Latin synōnymum, from Greek sunōnumon, from neuter of sunōnumos, synonymous; see synonymous.]

syn′o·nym′ic, syn′o·nym′i·cal adj.
syn′o·nym′i·ty n.

synonym

(ˈsɪnəˌnɪm)
n
1. (Linguistics) a word that means the same or nearly the same as another word, such as bucket and pail
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a word or phrase used as another name for something, such as Hellene for a Greek
3. (Biology) biology a taxonomic name that has been superseded or rejected
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek sunōnumon, from syn- + onoma name]
ˌsynoˈnymic, ˌsynoˈnymical adj
ˌsynoˈnymity n

syn•o•nym

(ˈsɪn ə nɪm)

n.
1. a word having the same or nearly the same meaning as another in the language, as joyful in relation to elated and glad.
2. a word or expression accepted as another name for something, as Arcadia for pastoral simplicity; metonym.
[1400–50; Middle English sinonyme < Middle French < Latin synōnymum < Greek synṓnymon, n. use of neuter of synṓnymos synonymous]
syn`o•nym′ic, syn`o•nym′i•cal, adj.
syn`o•nym′i•ty, n.

synonym

A word that mean the same as another word.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.synonym - two words that can be interchanged in a context are said to be synonymous relative to that context
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
antonym, opposite, opposite word - a word that expresses a meaning opposed to the meaning of another word, in which case the two words are antonyms of each other; "to him the antonym of `gay' was `depressed'"
Translations
synonymum
synonym
sinonimo
synonyymi
istoznačnicasinonim
szinonima
samheiti
sinonim
sopomenkasinonim

synonym

[ˈsɪnənɪm] Nsinónimo m

synonym

[ˈsɪnənɪm] nsynonyme m

synonym

nSynonym nt

synonym

[ˈsɪnənɪm] nsinonimo
References in classic literature ?
He was beset by ideas and in the throes of one of his ideas was uncontrollable.
David began to utter sounds that would have shocked his delicate organs in more wakeful moments; in short, all but Hawkeye and the Mohicans lost every idea of consciousness, in uncontrollable drowsiness.
Then suddenly, as if obeying an uncontrollable impulse, he crushed it like a flower again and again against his burning lips, and darted away.
In the little chaos of Pearl's character there might be seen emerging and could have been from the very first -- the steadfast principles of an unflinching courage -- an uncontrollable will -- sturdy pride, which might be disciplined into self-respect -- and a bitter scorn of many things which, when examined, might be found to have the taint of falsehood in them.
And then all were gone, and the mourners went back to the place which should know her no more; and Marie's room was darkened, and she lay on the bed, sobbing and moaning in uncontrollable grief, and calling every moment for the attentions of all her servants.
He got on to the bed, and wrenched open the lattice, bursting, as he pulled at it, into an uncontrollable passion of tears.
It seemed actually like the laughter of young things, the uncontrollable laughter of children who were trying not to be heard but who in a moment or so--as their excitement mounted--would burst forth.
The uncontrollable and hopeless mass of decomposition so engendered, would have polluted the air, even if poverty and deprivation had not loaded it with their intangible impurities; the two bad sources combined made it almost insupportable.
De Bracy was the first to break silence by an uncontrollable fit of laughter, wherein he was joined, though with more moderation, by the Templar.
Dorian Gray glanced at the picture, and suddenly an uncontrollable feeling of hatred for Basil Hallward came over him, as though it had been suggested to him by the image on the canvas, whispered into his ear by those grinning lips.
More business he demanded, and more, and more, until his captains, like a thirty-horse team of galloping horses, became very nearly uncontrollable.