synostosis


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syn·os·to·sis

 (sĭn′ŏs-tō′sĭs)
n. pl. syn·os·to·ses (-sēz)
The fusion of normally separate skeletal bones.

[syn- + Greek osteon, bone; see ost- in Indo-European roots + -osis.]

syn′os·tot′ic (-tŏt′ĭk) adj.

synostosis

(ˌsɪnɒsˈtəʊsɪs)
n
(Anatomy) anatomy the (normal or abnormal) fusion of adjacent bones

syn•os•to•sis

(ˌsɪn ɒˈstoʊ sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
the union of separate bones into a single bone.
[1840–50; contraction of synosteosis]
Translations

syn·os·to·sis

, synosteosis
n. sinostosis, union ósea entre dos huesos adyacentes;
senile ______ senil;
tribacillary ______ tribacilar.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is still a controversial discussion concerning the ICV of patients with isolated sagittal synostosis and scaphocephaly as it has been reported by different authors to be greater, less, or equal to the general population (Heller et al.
Other complications like deep infection, synostosis, plate fracture, compartment syndrome, or iatrogenic neurological or vascular damage were not found.
2-4) Although open reduction and plate fixation ensures a more immediate fixation, it is associated with higher rates of complications, such as infection, synostosis, and re-fracture.
Matthew was born with a rare cranial birth defect called metopic synostosis, a condition that affects one in 15,000 babies, according to data from Boston Children's Hospital.
A common condition, DP has been referred to by many names, such as deformational posterior plagiocephaly, positional plagiocephaly, posterior plagiocephaly, occipital plagiocephaly, nonsynostosis plagiocephaly, or plagiocephaly without synostosis (Flannery, Looman, & Kemper, 2012; Laughlin, Luerssen, & Dias, for the Committee on Practice and Ambulatory Medicine Section on Neurological Surgery, 2011; Looman & Flannery, 2012; Shweikeh, Nuno, Danielpour, Krieger, & Drazin, 2013).
2007) indicated that syndesmosis fixation through four cortices results in a greater risk of tibiofibular synostosis and motion restriction, when compared to three-cortex fixation [33].
CT scans of the ankle and subtalar joint showing a synostosis between the talus and the calcaneus.
An anechoic cartilaginous area between the midline of the frontal bone and the nasal bones can be recognized and identifies the nasal bridge, the hyperechogenic nasal bone synostosis can therefore accurately be measured.
In most cases, anomalies including hypertelorism, epicantus, upward-slanting palpebral fissures, clinodactyly in the fifth finger, short nail folds, pes planus, joint laxity, dental problems and radioulnar synostosis have been identified (4, 7).
Signs of osteomyelitis (bone lucency, irregular fracture margins, periosteal reactions), occurrence of synostosis, loosening of screws, or additional fractures were noted.