systematicness

systematicness

(ˌsɪstəˈmætɪknɪs)
n
the nature of being systematic
References in periodicals archive ?
With such characteristics as clear-cut result and strong systematicness, it can solve fuzzy and hard-to-quantify problems (Song Yongpeng.
Meanwhile, FCE usually lacks systematicness and generality when it is used to solve different evaluation models [12].
The number of correlations is not the only parameter; systematicness of the correlations is also crucial for the ability of their detection.
In fact, it is a common challenge for the vascular surgeon when faces to peripheral artery occlusive disease because of its systematicness.
One is that the research of enterprise behavior at different levels in value chain generally lacks of systematicness from the perspective of macroscopic.
156) Thus, it is difficult to discuss, with any specificity, a hypothetical case of a crime against humanity against a civilian transgender or intersex population and analyze its systematicness.
Whereas totality denotes the observation of social life as systematic, and systematicness in its turn, the identification of a universal structure, the manifestations of which indeed constitute social life, the aspirations towards meaningfulness are primarily associated with the study of social life in oral tradition cultures (lacking written language) (cf.
Because the systematicness and nature of our data collection as well as our research questions have shifted over time, looking at our data over a number of cohorts allows us to raise additional questions of both content and methodology.
My work, I was told, did not measure up to this reviewer's desire for rigour and systematicness.
Likewise, the qualitative methodology does not imply subjectivity or haphazardness of analytic observations, but validity of observations is ensured through the systematicness, replicability and detailed nature of the analytic procedures.
One could liken the change from Stella's early to late work to Ludwig Wittgenstein's shift from the systematicness of the Tractatus Logicophilosophicus, 1921, to the openness of the Philosophical Investigations, 1953, but that would be to ignore the fact that for Wittgenstein every language game represents new possibilities, a new configuration of life, while Stella's visual language games reimagine death.