tacker


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tack 1

 (tăk)
n.
1. A short, light nail with a sharp point and a flat head.
2. Nautical
a. A rope for holding down the weather clew of a course.
b. A rope for hauling the outer lower corner of a studdingsail to the boom.
c. The part of a sail, such as the weather clew of a course, to which this rope is fastened.
d. The lower forward corner of a fore-and-aft sail.
3. Nautical
a. The position of a vessel relative to the trim of its sails.
b. The act of changing from one position or direction to another.
c. The distance or leg sailed between changes of position or direction.
4. An approach to accomplishing a goal or a method of dealing with a problem.
5. A large, loose stitch made as a temporary binding or as a marker.
6. Stickiness, as that of a newly painted surface.
v. tacked, tack·ing, tacks
v.tr.
1. To fasten or attach with a tack or tacks: tacked the carpet down.
2. To fasten or mark (cloth or a seam, for example) with a loose basting stitch.
3. To put together loosely and arbitrarily: tacked some stories together in an attempt to write a novel.
4. To add as an extra item; append: tacked two dollars onto the bill.
5. Nautical To bring (a vessel) into the wind in order to change course or direction.
v.intr.
1. Nautical
a. To change the direction of a sailing vessel, especially by turning the bow into and past the direction of the wind: Stand by to tack.
b. To sail a zigzag course upwind by repeatedly executing such a maneuver.
c. To change tack: The ship tacked to starboard.
2. To change one's course of action.

[Middle English tak, fastener, from Old North French taque, probably of Germanic origin.]

tack′er n.
tack′less adj.

tack 2

 (tăk)
n.
Food, especially coarse or inferior foodstuffs.

[Origin unknown.]

tack 3

 (tăk)
n.
The harness for a horse, including the bridle and saddle.

[Short for tackle.]

tacker

(ˈtækə)
n
1. a person or thing that tacks
2. slang Austral a young person; child
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tacker - a worker who fastens things by tacking them (as with tacks or by spotwelding)
worker - a person who works at a specific occupation; "he is a good worker"
2.tacker - a sewer who fastens a garment with long loose stitchestacker - a sewer who fastens a garment with long loose stitches
sewer - someone who sews; "a sewer of fine gowns"
3.tacker - a hand-held machine for driving staples home
machine - any mechanical or electrical device that transmits or modifies energy to perform or assist in the performance of human tasks
References in periodicals archive ?
Sh Providing And Services Care Tacker For Guest House And Cleaning And Sweeping For Sub Division Office And Guest House Including Toilet
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Sarah Page Tacker has been named deputy attorney general for the Public Protection Department of the Arkansas Attorney General's Off ice in Little Rock.
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In 2nd incident IP/SPO Shah Asad and SI/PO Nawaz recovered a Corolla car near Swabi, stolen from Lahore, whose location was detected by the tacker company that was also handed over to its owner after verification.
Wallace, who has taken over as Pars' penalty tacker, drilled a low shot into the bottom corner of the net past Michael Andrews.
Two major Indian television stars, Karan Tacker and Krystle D'Souza, will take fans through some of the best Hindi film hits and dance numbers at Desi Fusion on June 27 at the Shaikh Rashid Auditorium, Indian High School, Dubai.
Vasigh, Tacker (both economics, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical U.
As an example, the Arkansas Scheduler has been developed for humid growing conditions, using regressions from daily climatic data at six locations throughout the Mid-South to estimate ET from maximum temperature (Vories and Tacker, 2006).
Chiang, Chen, and Xu 2007; Vasigh, Fleming, and Tacker 2008).