tadpole


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tadpole
from top to bottom:
egg and three stages of a tadpole metamorphosing into a frog

tad·pole

 (tăd′pōl′)
n.
The aquatic larva of a frog or toad, having gills, a long, laterally compressed tail, and in early stages, no limbs. During metamorphosis of a tadpole into an adult, legs and lungs develop, and the tail gradually disappears. Also called polliwog.

[Middle English taddepol : tadde, tode, toad; see toad + pol, head; see poll.]
Word History: The word tadpole, which first appears in English in the 1400s, is an old compound word whose meaning is no longer transparent. Tad is a variant of the word toad, while pole is simply an alternative spelling of poll, meaning "head." Tadpole thus means "a toad that is all head," so to speak. Nowadays, the original meaning of the word poll, "head," is most prominent in poll tax, "a tax consisting of a fixed amount and levied on all individuals," a kind of tax that also often used to be called a head tax. (In modern times, poll taxes are most often levied on adults eligible to vote.) The most common senses of poll today are probably "a survey of public opinion" and "the place where votes are cast." The word probably developed these senses at least partly through the notion of the head as the most prominent part of each individual in a crowd—the part that could be counted. A similar notion is found in the phrase "a head of cattle."

tadpole

(ˈtædˌpəʊl)
n
(Animals) the aquatic larva of frogs, toads, etc, which develops from a limbless tailed form with external gills into a form with internal gills, limbs, and a reduced tail
[C15 taddepol, from tadde toad + pol head, poll]

tad•pole

(ˈtæd poʊl)

n.
the aquatic larva of frogs and toads, having internal gills and a tail.
[1400–50; late Middle English tad(de)pol=tad(de) toad + pol poll]
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tadpole
development of a frog from a fertilized egg through several tadpole stages

tad·pole

(tăd′pōl′)
The larval stage of a frog or toad. A tadpole lives in the water, has a tail and gills, and has no limbs. The tail and gills disappear as the legs and lungs develop on the way to the adult stage.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tadpole - a larval frog or toadtadpole - a larval frog or toad    
amphibia, class Amphibia - the class of vertebrates that live on land but breed in water; frogs; toads; newts; salamanders; caecilians
larva - the immature free-living form of most invertebrates and amphibians and fish which at hatching from the egg is fundamentally unlike its parent and must metamorphose
Translations
شُرْغوف: فَرْخ الضَّفْدَعفَرْخُ الضِّفْدِع
pulec
haletudse
ranido
بچه قورباغه
nuijapääsammakonpoikanen
punoglavac
békaporontyebihal
berudu
halakarta
おたまじゃくし
올챙이
ranularanunculus
buožgalvis
kurkulis
mormoloc
žubrienka
paglavec
grodyngel
ลูกกบ
iribaşkurbağa yavrusu
con nòng nọcnọc nọcnòng nọc

tadpole

[ˈtædpəʊl] Nrenacuajo m

tadpole

[ˈtædpəʊl] ntêtard m

tadpole

nKaulquappe f

tadpole

[ˈtædˌpəʊl] ngirino

tadpole

(ˈtӕdpəul) noun
a young frog or toad in its first stage of development.

tadpole

فَرْخُ الضِّفْدِع pulec haletudse Kaulquappe γυρίνος renacuajo sammakonpoikanen têtard punoglavac girino オタマジャクシ 올챙이 kikkervisje rumpetroll kijanka girino головастик grodyngel ลูกกบ iribaş con nòng nọc 蝌蚪
References in classic literature ?
The cachalot is a disagreeable creature, more tadpole than fish, according to Fredol's description.
he stifled a vehement yawn--"What a Cockney tadpole of a ruffian you look
The egg from which they first developed into tadpole form was deposited, with millions of others, in one of the warm pools and with it a poisonous serum that the carnivora instinctively shunned.
considerable heat that it was a species of gigantic Tadpole (
Young Green and little Hall, commonly called Tadpole, from his great black head and thin legs, slept side by side far away by the door, and were for ever playing one another tricks, which usually ended, as on this morning, in open and violent collision; and now, unmindful of all order and authority, there they were, each hauling away at the other's bedclothes with one hand, and with the other, armed with a slipper, belabouring whatever portion of the body of his adversary came within reach.
He had besides the things before mentioned, twelve marbles, part of a jews-harp, a piece of blue bottle-glass to look through, a spool cannon, a key that wouldn't unlock anything, a fragment of chalk, a glass stopper of a decanter, a tin soldier, a couple of tadpoles, six fire-crackers, a kitten with only one eye, a brass door- knob, a dog-collar -- but no dog -- the handle of a knife, four pieces of orange-peel, and a dilapidated old window sash.
Snails clung to the sides of the tank; tadpoles and tiny fish swam swiftly in the green water, slippery efts and slimy frogs twined their noiseless way in and out of the weedy rock-work; and on top of the pyramid there sat solitary, cold as the stone, brown as the stone, motionless as the stone, a little bright-eyed toad.
more especially when we are so active in his service as we are), since he fails not the midges of the air, nor the grubs of the earth, nor the tadpoles of the water, and is so merciful that he maketh his sun to rise on the good and on the evil, and sendeth rain on the unjust and on the just.
This dreadful threat had the desired effect, and through the two remaining fields the three pair of small legs trotted on without any serious interruption, notwithstanding a small pond full of tadpoles, alias "bullheads," which the lads looked at wistfully.
When he was tired he lay face-downward on the grass and watched the eager scurrying of minnows and of tadpoles.
I remember the field and the pond with the tadpoles, and making haystacks with Mr.
I love to see that Nature is so rife with life that myriads can be afforded to be sacrificed and suffered to prey on one another; that tender organizations can be so serenely squashed out of existence like pulp -- tadpoles which herons gobble up, and tortoises and toads run over in the road; and that sometimes it has rained flesh and blood